NC-2009 IEQc3.1: Construction IAQ Management Plan—During Construction

  • NC CI IEQc3.1 Type3 Construction IAQ Diagram
  • Good IAQ benefits everyone

    Managing indoor air quality (IAQIndoor air quality: The quality and attributes of indoor air affecting the health and comfort building occupants. IAQ encompasses available fresh air, contaminant levels, acoustics and noise levels, lighting quality, and other factors.) systematically during construction is becoming more and more common as contractors gain more experience with LEED. It benefits the health of everyone who works on the site, not just the eventual occupants of the building. 

    Not a one-time thing

    Earning this credit can be fairly easy, but it does require careful coordination and buy-in from all the subcontractors and field personnel involved in the project. It’s important to remember that IAQ management is not a one-time compliance event that can be checked off a list—it must be an ongoing effort for the duration of the construction process.

    The contractor should create the IAQ management plan before construction even begins, and check on compliance at various times throughout the process—including collecting photos on a minimum of three separate dates for credit documentation.

    SMACNAThe Sheet Metal and Air Conditioning Contractors' National Association (SMACNA) is an international association of union contractors, in the United States, Canada, Australia, and Brazil. guidelines call for measures like wrapping ductwork to prevent dust from entering it during construction. (The commissioning process is supposed to catch poorly coordinated practices like the meeting of the sprinklers and ductwork here.) Photo – YRG Sustainability

    HVAC wrappingSMACNA guidelines call for measures like wrapping ductwork to prevent dust from entering it during construction. (The commissioning process is supposed to catch poorly coordinated practices like the meeting of the sprinklers and ductwork here.) Photo – YRG Sustainability

    Know the standard

    LEED requires you follow the SMACNA 2007 guidelines. (See Resources.) Chapter 3 of the guide describes Indoor Air Quality (IAQ) management. The standard was updated in 2008, but is virtually identical to the older version referenced in earlier versions of the LEED rating system. Note that although the SMACNA guidelines say they are for "occupied buildings under construction," these guidelines must be used by all LEED projects attempting this credit—occupied or not.

    The SMACNA 2007 document describes common sources for construction indoor air pollution and offers best practices to address them. When developing the IAQ Management Plan, the contractor should incorporate all of the recommended guidelines that are applicable to the project. 

    The following are the major areas covered by SMACNA.

    • HVAC Protection: Make sure that dust and construction debris do not accumulate in HVAC ducts. Strategies include wrapping HVAC ducts in plastic and storing ductwork in dust free areas before installing.
    • Source Control: Address the sources of construction pollution and looking for ways to reduce them. Strategies include using low-VOCA volatile organic compound (VOC) is a carbon compound that vaporizes (becomes a gas) at normal room temperatures. VOCs contribute to air pollution directly and through atmospheric photochemical reactions (excluding carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, carbonic acid, metallic carbides and carbonates, and ammonium carbonate) to produce secondary air pollutants, principally ozone and peroxyacetyl nitrate. materials, paints, coatings, adhesives, sealantsA sealant has adhesive properties and is formulated primarily to fill, seal, or waterproof gaps or joints between 2 surfaces. Sealants include sealant primers and caulks. (SCAQMD Rule 1168. )Sealants are used on wood, fabric, paper, corrugated paperboard, plastic foam and other materials with tiny openings, often microscopic, that may absorb or discharge gas or fluid. (as covered in IEQc4.1–4.4); exhausting gas-fueled construction equipment directly to the outside; and storing VOC-containing materials away from absorptive materials.
    • Pathway Interruption: Use negative pressure and or temporary hanging plastic to contain areas that may generate construction dust, for example, wood-cutting and drywall-cutting areas.
    • Housekeeping: Keep a clean work site by sweeping, wet mopping and using low-VOC cleaners.
    • Scheduling: Coordinate the movement of occupants to minimize their exposure to construction debris; schedule installation of absorptive materials to limit the materials’ exposure to VOCs and moisture.

     

    HVAC components that are poorly protected from dust and construction debris, as in this photo, can cause equipment malfunctions and poor IAQ during occupancy.

    Poorly covered ductsHVAC components that are poorly protected from dust and construction debris, as in this photo, can cause equpiment malfunctions and poor IAQ during occupancy.

    More than just SMACNA

    In addition to the SMACNA requirements your project will be required to protect absorptive material from moisture through proper scheduling and storage. This includes drywall, carpet, ceiling tiles, and any other absorptive materials. Take pictures of this for documentation.

    If HVAC equipment will be used during construction, you will need to install MERV 8 filters before operating them and replace them before the building is occupied.

    Filter standards for international projects

    International projects can follow international filter standards if using HVAC equipment during construction:

    • Europe: Class F5 (defined by CEN Standard EN 779-2002)
    • East Asia: Medium Efficiency or High Efficiency (defined by Chinese Standard GB/T 14295-2008)
    • For all international projects: Minimum dust stop efficiency of 30% and arrestance of 90% for particles between 3–10 picograms

    All other applicable SMACNA guidelines should be incorporated into the IAQ Management Plan.

     

Legend

  • Best Practices
  • Gotcha
  • Action Steps
  • Cost Tip

Construction Documents

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  • This credit relies heavily on SMACNA’s best-practice management guide that addresses construction IAQ management in five areas: HVAC protection, source control, pathway interruption, housekeeping, and scheduling. (See Resources.) Develop the project IAQ plan for use throughout construction. You can use the customizable IAQ plan provided by LEEDuser—see the Documentation Toolkit.


  • Poorly covered HVAC ductsWith all of the SMACNA guidelines, there is a right way to do it—and then there are the other ways, like this poorly covered ductwork. Do it right, and document it with photos. Photo – YRG SustainabilityYour project IAQ plan must address all five areas of the SMACNA guide, protection of absorptive materials, and use of MERV 8 filters (if applicable). Although you’re not required to employ every SMACNA guideline, it's a good idea to implement as many of the guidelines as possible unless you can reasonably justify not doing so. Projects that implement only a few SMACNA guidelines run the risk of having the credit rejected during LEED review. For example, it would be a red flag if your HVAC units arrived from the manufacturer wrapped in plastic, but you didn’t cover open-ended ducts to protect them once they were installed, or didn’t have any photos to back up the claim that ducts arrived wrapped.


  • The owner and design team need to ensure that IAQ guidelines, such as an IAQ plan, HVAC protection, source control, pathway interruption, housekeeping, and scheduling, have been integrated into the construction specifications.    


  • Masterspec offers sample LEED specifications for construction documents. It includes an entire section specific to IAQ management. (See Resources.) The contractor also needs to protect absorptive material from moisture. This is for both installed and stored absorptive materials, like drywall, carpet, and ceiling tiles. You should also take pictures of this for documentation. If HVAC equipment will be used during construction, you will need to install MERV 8 filters and replace them before the building is occupied.

     


  • Construction specifications can include IAQ-related items such as procedures to follow, a sample IAQ plan, and VOC limits on materials related to IEQc4: Low-Emitting Materials, no-smoking policies, the request to use dustless equipment, a request to have ductwork arrive pre-wrapped, and more.


  • Some contractors may charge a premium for implementing and documenting this credit, but in general, added costs should be minor as more firms start incorporating these as standard best practices. 


  • Hiring construction teams with LEED experience is helpful, as is reviewing LEED requirements and responsibilities with the contractor during the bidding process.


  • Accountability is key to successfully implementing an IAQ plan. Ensure that subcontractors are required implement their parts of the IAQ plan, and to get specific processes and materials approved. 

Construction

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  • Preparation Before Construction Begins


  • The general contractor (GC) should go over all LEED-specific issues—including IAQ management, the role of low-emitting materials, environmental materials tracking tools, construction waste management, and more—at an orientation meeting.


  • It’s a good idea for the GC to meet with subcontractors to reinforce the LEED responsibilities related specifically to their trades. This exercise helps to build trust and is crucial for obtaining buy-in from all participants in the process.


  • Enabling coordination and communication among the GC, subcontractors, and the design team early in the process can minimize scheduling delays and pushback from subcontractors.


  • The GC distributes the Indoor Air Quality plan outlining procedures and best practices to be distributed to subcontractors prior to the construction phase. The plan should clearly identify who is responsible for implementing each component of the plan—for example, “Wrapping installed open-ended HVAC ductwork is the responsibility of the mechanical contractor,” and “Quality control is the responsibility of the general contractor.” 


  • Develop a checklist for weekly activities that lists SMACNA guidelines, protection of absorptive material, and use of MERV 8 filters along with related to-do items, such as taking photographs to document the IAQ strategies. It’s a convenient way to stay on top of required tasks, and the checklist can be used at weekly meetings and posted around the site. See the Documentation Toolkit for a sample checklist.


  • During Construction


  • The contractor and subs should ensure that SMACNA practices are being followed. Each of the five major SMACNA areas is addressed in detail below.  


  • Decide whether HVAC units will be used during construction. If so, ensure that MERV 8 filters have been purchased and are used throughout the site. Remember that any filters used during construction must be replaced prior to occupancy.


  • Post copies of the IAQ plan in various places around the construction site to ensure that the plan is being followed. Hang signs that remind subcontractors to follow IAQ practices such as covering exposed ductwork with plastic, wet mopping regularly, and using low-VOC products and other SMACNA practices. See the Documentation Toolkit for sample signage.


  • Assign an IAQ manager to assist the GC. This person can run spot-checks for SMACNA and other best-practice compliance.  


  • HVAC Protection


  • Follow SMACNA strategies for HVAC protection that are appropriate to your project. These include items such as the following:

    • Wrapped, stored ductworkThis ductwork was ordered wrapped, and was stored away from construction work until installation. Photo – YRG Sustainabilitywrapping ductwork and or ventilation equipment in plastic once it arrives on site;
    • ordering ductwork pre-wrapped in plastic before it is delivered to the site;
    • placing ductwork or ventilation equipment in a room away from construction work to protect it from dust until it is installed and covered;
    • covering exposed grilles with plastic once ductwork is installed;
    • and laying plastic over underfloor air systems to keep out construction debris.

  • Ordering ductwork pre-wrapped in plastic or having open grilles sealed once installed may add slightly to costs, but pre-wrapped ductwork, for example, makes HVAC protection easy to achieve.


  • Source Control


  • Follow SMACNA strategies for source control that are appropriate to your project. These include items such as the following.

    • For construction materials storage, do not use VOC controlThis project used low-emitting paints, sealants, and adhesives, and stored them in a closet to protect air quality. Photo – YRG Sustainabilitymechanical rooms or air-mixing rooms as many products give off gases that can be absorbed by other materials or could be distributed to other areas through the ventilation system.
    • Use only low-emitting adhesives; sealants; paints, coatings; flooring products; composite woods; and furniture, wall, and ceiling systems. 
    • When cleaning the construction space, use low-VOC cleaners.
    • Combustion-based construction equipment used in the interior of a building should be exhausted directly to the outside. Long-snake exhaust pipes can be attached to this type of equipment for easy exhausting out of windows.
    • When combustion-based, stand-alone heating units are used for supplemental heating during construction, it may be best to keep the heating units outdoors to exhaust and pump the heat to the indoors.

  • Using low-emitting materials helps projects gain the Low-Emitting Materials series of credits—IEQc4.1: Adhesive and Sealants, IEQc4.2: Paints and Coatings, IEQc4.3: Flooring Systems, and IEQc4.4: Composite Wood and Agrifiber Products.


  • Using low-VOC construction materials and cleaning products helps to pass the air-quality test for IEQc3.2: Construction IAQ Management Plan Before Occupancy


  • Using low-VOC products—adhesives, sealants, paints, coatings, flooring systems, and composite wood—should add little to no extra cost. 


  • It is a good idea for the GC to set up a supervisory mechanism, such as designating an IAQ manager to run quality control checks and to ensure that the proper products and procedures are being used. 


  • The IAQ management plan should specifically state who is responsible for ensuring that low-VOC materials are used onsite, and the GC should verify that the products and procedures being used by each subcontractor are in compliance.


  • Pathway Interruption


  • Follow SMACNA strategies for pathway interruption that are appropriate to your project. These include items such as the following:

    • Elevator shaftsThe base-building elevator shafts were sealed on this project to prevent movement of dust. Photo – YRG SustainabilityTemporary barriers and self-contained dustless apparatus, such as concrete grinders and drywall sanders, can be helpful to isolate and protect finished construction areas from areas that are still under construction. Isolate construction dust produced by activities like cutting drywall or wood. 
    • Separate construction zones from occupied zones.

  • Contain construction air pollution by exhausting air to create negative pressure in construction areas. 


  • Plastic barriers are the most inexpensive, but drywall or cloth partitions can be used as well.


  • Housekeeping


  • Follow SMACNA strategies for housekeeping that are appropriate to your project. These include items such as the following:

    • Wet moppingWet mopping on a daily basis during construction keeps down dust. Photo – YRG SustainabilityWet mopping helps keep construction dust particles from becoming airborne.
    • Frequent sweeping helps control construction dust and keeps construction materials free of debris.

  • Housekeeping is a no- to low-cost measure and is simple to implement.  


  • These practices may be slightly time-consuming, but will help to create a healthier working environment for all the construction workers onsite on a daily basis. Communicating this point frequently to everyone on the site can help to build compliance. 


  • Scheduling


  • Carefully schedule construction and any necessary occupant moves in a manner that reduces occupant exposure to construction pollution. 


  • Carefully examine the sequencing of material installation before construction begins.  Schedule installation to protect absorptive materials from construction pollution. For example, do not store or install acoustic ceiling tiles before painting occurs or flooring products are installed because the ceiling tiles will absorb the off-gassing paint or floor adhesives and will contaminate the air over a longer time period. This could also compromise the project’s ability to attain IEQc3.2: Construction IAQ Management Plan—Before Occupancy. 


  • Scheduling is a no-cost measure but needs to be coordinated before construction begins.


  • Wrap-Up and Documentation


  • Take photos throughout the construction process to demonstrate that your IAQ plan has been followed. There is no specific number of photos required, but they must be taken at two or more different stages of the project. For reference, prior to 2009 this credit required at least 16 photos—see the Documentation Toolkit for examples.


  • All five SMACNA control measures have to be documented in a photo log. It is easy to take pictures of covered ducts, but don’t forget to also take photos of more process-oriented strategies such as housekeeping and pathway interruption. The pictures should clearly show all the control measures adopted during construction. Photos should be submitted with a brief description, the time and date, and an indication of what SMACNA practice is demonstrated. 


  • MERV 8 filtersThese MERV 8 filters were installed prior to initial system start-up, and replaced prior to occupancy. Photo – YRG SustainabilityIf the building’s air handlers are used, replace all filters (MERV 8) required during construction with new filters—after construction and before occupants move into the space.


  • Replace construction filters with MERV 13 filters if the project is also attempting to earn credit for IEQc5: Indoor Environmental Pollutant Source Control.


  • It is usually a good idea to do a “mini air flush” (if your project is not attempting IEQc3.2) before occupancy to help remove any lingering VOCs from the construction process. This can be as simple as putting industrial sized fans in the window and pumping in fresh air overnight or running the HVAC exhaust on high for a few days. (See IEQc3.2: Construction Indoor Air Quality Plan—Before Occupancy if the team wants to do a full flush-out for an additional LEED point.)


  • Fill out the LEED Online form and upload the IAQ plan, photos with SMACNA descriptions, and cut sheets of MERV filters used onsite during construction, if air handlers were used.


  • Alternatives to installing MERV 8 filters include not using the building HVAC units, bringing in a stand-alone temporary system, or using natural ventilation.

Operations & Maintenance

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  • O&M staff can use the IAQ plan for future renovations.

  • USGBC

    Excerpted from LEED 2009 for New Construction and Major Renovations

    IEQ Credit 3.1: Construction IAQ management plan - during construction

    1 Point

    Intent

    To reduce indoor air quality (IAQIndoor air quality: The quality and attributes of indoor air affecting the health and comfort building occupants. IAQ encompasses available fresh air, contaminant levels, acoustics and noise levels, lighting quality, and other factors.) problems resulting from construction or renovation and promote the comfort and well-being of construction workers and building occupants.

    Requirements

    Develop and implement an IAQIndoor air quality: The quality and attributes of indoor air affecting the health and comfort building occupants. IAQ encompasses available fresh air, contaminant levels, acoustics and noise levels, lighting quality, and other factors. management plan for the construction and preoccupancy phases of the building as follows:

    • During construction, meet or exceed the recommended control measures of the Sheet Metal and Air Conditioning National Contractors Association (SMACNAThe Sheet Metal and Air Conditioning Contractors' National Association (SMACNA) is an international association of union contractors, in the United States, Canada, Australia, and Brazil.) IAQ Guidelines For Occupied Buildings Under Construction, 2nd Edition 2007, ANSI/ SMACNA 008-2008 (Chapter 3).
    • Protect stored on-site and installed absorptive materials from moisture damage.
    • If permanently installed air handlers are used during construction, filtration media must be used at each return air grille that meets one of the following criteria below. Replace all filtration media immediately prior to occupancy.
      • Filtration media with a minimum efficiency reporting value (MERVMinimum Efficiency Reporting Value (MERV) rating is an American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE) measurement scale which rates the effectiveness of air filters. ) of 8 as determined by ASHRAE Standard 52.2-1999 (with errata but without addenda1)
      • Filtration media is Class F5 or higher, as defined by CEN Standard EN 779-2002, Particulate air filters for general ventilation, Determination of the filtration performance
      • [East Asia ACP: Construction IAQ Equivalent]
      • Filtration media with a minimum dust spot efficiency of 30% or higher and greater than 90% arrestance on a particle size of 3–10 µg

    Alternative Compliance Paths (ACPs)

    East Asia ACP: Construction IAQ Equivalent

    Projects in East Asia may use filtration media classified as medium efficiency (中效过滤器) or higher as defined by Chinese standard GB/T 14295-2008(空气过滤器).

    Potential Technologies & Strategies

     Adopt an IAQIndoor air quality: The quality and attributes of indoor air affecting the health and comfort building occupants. IAQ encompasses available fresh air, contaminant levels, acoustics and noise levels, lighting quality, and other factors. management plan to protect the heating, ventilating and air conditioning (HVAC) system during construction, control pollutant sources and interrupt contamination pathways. Sequence the installation of materials to avoid contamination of absorptive materials, such as insulation, carpeting, ceiling tile and gypsum wallboard. Coordinate with IEQ Credit 3.2: Construction IAQ Management PlanA construction IAQ management plan outlines measures to minimize contamination in a specific project building during construction and describes procedures to flush the building of contaminants prior to occupancy. — Before Occupancy and IEQ Credit 5: Indoor Chemical & Pollutant Source Control to determine the appropriate specifications and schedules for filtration media.

    If possible, avoid using permanently installed air handlers for temporary heating/cooling during construction. Consult the LEED Reference Guide for Green Building Design and Construction, 2009 Edition for more detailed information on how to ensure the well-being of construction workers and building occupants if permanently installed air handlers must be used during construction.

Technical Guides

IEQ Space Matrix - 2nd Edition

This updated version of the spreadsheet categories dozens of specific space types according to how they should be applied under various IEQ credits. This document is essential if you have questions about how various unique space types should be treated. Up to date, 2nd Edition.


U.S. EPA Controlling Pollutants and Sources

The EPA website provides information regarding typical sources of indoor and outdoor pollutants and methods for resolving indoor air quality concerns. Find detailed information on exhaust or spot ventilation practices during construction.


IEQ Space Matrix - 1st Ed.

This spreadsheet categories dozens of specific space types according to how they should be applied under various IEQ credits. This document is essential if you have questions about how various unique space types should be treated.  This is the 1st edition.

Publications

California Air Resources Board Indoor Air Pollution Report, July 2005

This report, released in July 2005, covers the significant health effects caused by indoor air pollution, including respiratory illness and disease, asthma attacks, cancer, and premature death. The report describes the health effects, sources, and concentrations of indoor air pollutants; existing regulations, guidelines, and practices for indoor air pollution; and ways to prevent and reduce indoor air pollution.


The State of Washington Program and IAQ Standards

This standard was the first state-initiated program to ensure the design of buildings with acceptable IAQIndoor air quality: The quality and attributes of indoor air affecting the health and comfort building occupants. IAQ encompasses available fresh air, contaminant levels, acoustics and noise levels, lighting quality, and other factors..


Indoor Air Quality: A Facility Manager’s Guide, published by the Construction Technology Centre Atlantic

A comprehensive review of indoor air quality issues and solutions.

Organizations

Sheet Metal and Air Conditioning Contractors’ National Association, Inc. (SMACNA)

SMACNAThe Sheet Metal and Air Conditioning Contractors' National Association (SMACNA) is an international association of union contractors, in the United States, Canada, Australia, and Brazil. is an international organization that developed guidelines for maintaining healthful indoor air quality during demolitions, renovations, and construction. The professional trade association publishes the referenced standard as well as Indoor Air Quality: A Systems Approach, a comprehensive document that covers air pollutant sources, control measures, IAQIndoor air quality: The quality and attributes of indoor air affecting the health and comfort building occupants. IAQ encompasses available fresh air, contaminant levels, acoustics and noise levels, lighting quality, and other factors. process management, quality control and documentation, interpersonal communication , sample projects, tables, references, resources, and checklists.


Masterspec

Masterspec offers guidance on how to write LEED specifications into construction documents. It includes an entire section specific to IAQIndoor air quality: The quality and attributes of indoor air affecting the health and comfort building occupants. IAQ encompasses available fresh air, contaminant levels, acoustics and noise levels, lighting quality, and other factors. management.

Construction IAQ Management Plan

The Indoor Air Quality Management Plan outlines procedures and best practices covering all five areas of SMACNAThe Sheet Metal and Air Conditioning Contractors' National Association (SMACNA) is an international association of union contractors, in the United States, Canada, Australia, and Brazil. guidelines. Shown here is a template formatted with the sections the IAQIndoor air quality: The quality and attributes of indoor air affecting the health and comfort building occupants. IAQ encompasses available fresh air, contaminant levels, acoustics and noise levels, lighting quality, and other factors. plan should cover and giving guidance on how to customize the template to develop your own IAQ plan. Also shown here is a sample IAQ plan from a Harvard University project.

Weekly IAQ Checklist

A checklist like this can be used at regular meetings between the GCA General Contractor (GC) manages, coordinates, and oversees building construction; may perform some construction tasks; and is responsible for hiring and managing subcontractors. and subcontractors to ensure that IAQIndoor air quality: The quality and attributes of indoor air affecting the health and comfort building occupants. IAQ encompasses available fresh air, contaminant levels, acoustics and noise levels, lighting quality, and other factors. management plan measures are being followed.

IAQ Photo Documentation

All five SMACNAThe Sheet Metal and Air Conditioning Contractors' National Association (SMACNA) is an international association of union contractors, in the United States, Canada, Australia, and Brazil. control measures have to be documented in a photo log. It is easy to take pictures of covered ducts, but don’t forget to also take photos of more process-oriented strategies such as housekeeping and pathway interruption. The pictures should clearly show all the control measures adopted during construction. Photos should be submitted with a brief description, the time and date, and an indication of what SMACNA practice is demonstrated.

Jobsite Signage

Use jobsite signage like this sample to remind contractors of SMACNAThe Sheet Metal and Air Conditioning Contractors' National Association (SMACNA) is an international association of union contractors, in the United States, Canada, Australia, and Brazil. requirements for this credit.

LEED Online Forms: NC-2009 IEQ

Sample LEED Online forms for all rating systems and versions are available on the USGBC website.

Construction Submittal

HardhatDocumentation for this credit is part of the Construction Phase submittal.

70 Comments

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Omar ElRawy Building Engineer, LEED AP BD+C EA Building Consultants
Oct 04 2016
Guest

Pesticides during construction

Dear all,
During the construction phase, the contractor asked to use pesticides once per week within the building. The reason is to offset rats and other insects that may harm the workers during construction.

I do find this practice severely affecting the building's IEQ in general (and IEQ credits 3 and 4 in specific), however, I cannot find a clear statement to govern such practices, so, should we allow this, or is there any hidden statement within LEED to prevent this?

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Omar ElRawy Building Engineer, LEED AP BD+C EA Building Consultants
Sep 19 2016
Guest

One or Two Documents

I'am confused about the document entitled "IAQIndoor air quality: The quality and attributes of indoor air affecting the health and comfort building occupants. IAQ encompasses available fresh air, contaminant levels, acoustics and noise levels, lighting quality, and other factors. Management Plan" that is required under both; IEQc3.1 and IEQc3.2.

Should I prepare only one document including IAQ during construction and flush-out, or one document per credit?

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CAROLINE PIN In charge of environmental certification on a jobsite , EIFFAGE CONSTRUCTION Sep 19 2016 Guest

Hello. You should prepare one document per credit. Separate IAQIndoor air quality: The quality and attributes of indoor air affecting the health and comfort building occupants. IAQ encompasses available fresh air, contaminant levels, acoustics and noise levels, lighting quality, and other factors. during construction and flush-out process.

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Francis Chua AIA, LEED AP BD+C, Project Architect at NK Architects Sep 19 2016 Guest

You can do it 2 ways. If your IAQIndoor air quality: The quality and attributes of indoor air affecting the health and comfort building occupants. IAQ encompasses available fresh air, contaminant levels, acoustics and noise levels, lighting quality, and other factors. Management Plan contains information on both Construction activities and Pre-Occupancy activities (Testing or flush-out), then you can use the same document for both credits, just make sure you upload it twice. And For IEQc3.2, they ask you to highlight the pre-occupancy activities. Or you can do it with 2 separate IAQ Management Plans as Caroline stated above. I prefer to use 1 document.

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Omar ElRawy Building Engineer, LEED AP BD+C, EA Building Consultants Sep 19 2016 Guest

Thanks a lot

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Lawrence Lile Chief Engineer Lile Engineering LLC
Jul 24 2016
LEEDuser Member

Diesel Exhaust

We have a project where a heavy drill will be drilling micropiles in the basement. It is going to be a diesel powered drill, and it will make a heckuva lot of fumes. We plan to open all the windows and put big fans at either end of the building (about 50 feet wide by 130 feet long) but we don't really have any other plan as to how to mitigate fumes. Our health and safety expert is OK with the plan. Will a LEED reviewer buy it for IEQ3.1?

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Michelle Halle Stern LEED Fellow, The Green Facilitator Jul 25 2016 LEEDuser Expert

My guess is that as long as you are meeting the other requirements of the credit (sealing ducts, filters) for any mechanical system that is already installed, then you should be ok. The intent of the credit is to 1. protect workers; and your EHS expert has that covered and 2. to protect future building occupants by making sure that any pollutants aren't absorbed or stored in building materials and systems with the potential to re-emit once the building is occupied. I would included documentation from the EHS expert to show that he/she was consulted and that you have a plan that was implemented.

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Kali Wolin Project Engineer Intern Donohoe Construction Company
Jun 16 2016
Guest

IAQ management plan-during construction or before occupancy

Project Location: United States

I am wondering if you can obtain the credit for Construction IAQ management planA construction IAQ management plan outlines measures to minimize contamination in a specific project building during construction and describes procedures to flush the building of contaminants prior to occupancy. DURING CONSTRUCTION along with BEFORE OCCUPANCY or if it is just one credit or the other. Any help would be greatly appreciated

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Heather Holdridge Sustainability Coordinator, Lake/Flato Architects Jun 16 2016 LEEDuser Member

You can earn both.

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Yasuhito Koike LEED AP, Green Building Consultant Izumi System Planning
Jan 21 2016
LEEDuser Member

µg not µm?

Reference guide Addenda allows to use filtration media with a minimum dust spot efficiency of 30% or higher and greater than 90% arrestance on a particle size of 3–10 "µg".

I suppose it is "µm" not "µg", but I'm not very familiar with the filter standards and I cannot judge it. Does anyone knows well about this?

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Michelle Halle Stern LEED Fellow, The Green Facilitator Jan 22 2016 LEEDuser Expert

I would assume you are right and that the units should be size and not mass. However, I am not a filter expert either.

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Hieu Huynh Environmental Engineer, LEED AP BD+C
Dec 13 2015
Guest

Doing monthly photo report of IAQ management

Project Location: Vietnam

Hi,

My project is under construction, but just structural work (finalizing substructure and launching superstructure). It is long way to furnishing and MEP work onsite. I have read several sample reports and it seems people start implementing and verifying the plan with photo after structural work is finished. Is that right? so is it true that I will do monthly photo reports for this credit only when MEP contractor and furnishing start off?

Thank you for your advice

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Michelle Halle Stern LEED Fellow, The Green Facilitator Dec 14 2015 LEEDuser Expert

The most important thing to photograph for this credit is the moisture protection of absorptive materials that will ultimately be installed inside the weatherproofing of the building. As soon as you have those type of materials on site you should be both protecting them and documenting that you are with photographs.

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Susan Walter Specifications Director, Populous Dec 14 2015 LEEDuser Expert

I know you posted in IEQc3.1 but the other area that needs to be photographed on a regular basis is SSp1. That documentation should have started when construction started.

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Saud Abdul Rasheed Sustainability/Energy Engineer, CEM, PMP, LEED AP BD+C, LEED AP O+M, Estidama PQP Dec 14 2015 Guest

Michelle/Susan,
Are photographs compulsory to achieve these credits (IEQc3 or SSp1)?
I see on leedonline there are options of providing a narrative or checklists also without needing photographs!

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Michelle Halle Stern LEED Fellow, The Green Facilitator Dec 14 2015 LEEDuser Expert

Yes both credits offer other options, but I like to have the pictures just to be safe, since you can't re-create them later.

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Susan Walter Specifications Director, Populous Dec 14 2015 LEEDuser Expert

Exactly. They are often the only way to prove you've done something or that the contractor fulfilled their responsibilities.

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Bridget Brock Huitt-Zollars Morris
Dec 10 2015
LEEDuser Member

IAQ Management Plan and IAQ Management Specification Section

Project Location: United States

I am working on a project where LEED was almost an after thought. I was brought into the project just after the 60% submittal. I am in a bit of a pinch with the 90% submittal due before Christmas. I know I need to include a IAQIndoor air quality: The quality and attributes of indoor air affecting the health and comfort building occupants. IAQ encompasses available fresh air, contaminant levels, acoustics and noise levels, lighting quality, and other factors. Management Spec section but am having a hard time finding a good one. Does anyone have any guidance on where I could find some samples of these?

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Saud Abdul Rasheed Sustainability/Energy Engineer, CEM, PMP, LEED AP BD+C, LEED AP O+M, Estidama PQP Dec 13 2015 Guest

Hi Bridget,
If you are a LEEDuser member then on this page you can find a "Construction Indoor Air Quality Management plan - Template" as well as a "sample IAQIndoor air quality: The quality and attributes of indoor air affecting the health and comfort building occupants. IAQ encompasses available fresh air, contaminant levels, acoustics and noise levels, lighting quality, and other factors. Management plan -Harvard University" in the documentation toolkit tab just above. Also you can check this link:

http://greenguard.org/files/IAQ%20Management%20Plan.pdf

I hope this would be helpful.

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Marina Radchenko
Nov 04 2015
Guest

Air cleaning for IEQc3.1 Construction IAQ management plan

Project Location: Russian Federation

We are going to apply for 1 point in credit IEQc3.1 but the Contractor is trying to avoid any ventilation during construction:
- no natural ventilation
- no ventilation by permanent system
- no any temporary/portable ventilation units.
I have not found any information that air cleaning/ventilation MUST take place and how often.
ALL absorptive materials will be protected, for construction works low-VOCA volatile organic compound (VOC) is a carbon compound that vaporizes (becomes a gas) at normal room temperatures. VOCs contribute to air pollution directly and through atmospheric photochemical reactions (excluding carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, carbonic acid, metallic carbides and carbonates, and ammonium carbonate) to produce secondary air pollutants, principally ozone and peroxyacetyl nitrate. materials will be used.
Could you please advice if its enough to make house keeping by sweeping (including by vacuum-cleaners), wet mopping and using low-VOC cleaners without any air cleaning?
Thank you!

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Nov 27 2015 LEEDuser Moderator

Marina, if you aren't ventilating then you the housekeeping guidelines for that don't apply—just focus on the other measures, as I think you're doing.

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Saud Abdul Rasheed Sustainability/Energy Engineer, CEM, PMP, LEED AP BD+C, LEED AP O+M, Estidama PQP
Oct 25 2015
Guest

Narrative for Option 2 Contractor confimration

Project Location: Saudi Arabia

Hi all,
We are not going to provide photos for this credit but we have an IAQIndoor air quality: The quality and attributes of indoor air affecting the health and comfort building occupants. IAQ encompasses available fresh air, contaminant levels, acoustics and noise levels, lighting quality, and other factors. plan developed and the contractor has been following it according to the credit requirement. My question is if we pursue option 2 The Contractor can confirm the implementation of the noted construction and pre-occupancy phase moisture protection methods, should we include all the five SMACNAThe Sheet Metal and Air Conditioning Contractors' National Association (SMACNA) is an international association of union contractors, in the United States, Canada, Australia, and Brazil. measures in the narrative? Or it would be enough to just write a description about absorptive materials protection? How detailed should this be?

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Michelle Halle Stern LEED Fellow, The Green Facilitator Oct 26 2015 LEEDuser Expert

I would include everything, since all measures are required. Make it detailed enough to understand the measures taken, but short enough that the reviewers can read it quickly.

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CAROLINE PIN In charge of environmental certification on a jobsite EIFFAGE CONSTRUCTION
Sep 16 2015
Guest

Checking oh IAQ management plan during construction

Project Location: France

Dear all,

I read it's necessary to do 3 date & time stamped visits with 6 photo for each visit to submet on LEED Online IEQ credit 3.1.
It is true ?
Actually I am doing a weekly visit with 10-15 photos so at the end I will have 90 report.
Thank you

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Michelle Halle Stern LEED Fellow, The Green Facilitator Sep 16 2015 LEEDuser Expert

More than enough photos if that show the requested information.

There are a number of posts on the subject in this forum if you search "photo"
From the form:

Option 1
Upload. Photographs documenting construction and pre-occupancy phase
moisture protection methods, for absorptive materials, have been provided.

Upload IEQc3.1-2. Provide photos documenting methods employed to
protect absorptive materials from moisture damage during construction and
pre-occupancy. Photos should highlight materials stored or installed on-site
and should include date and time stamp. Photos of all noted moisture
protection methods on at least 2 different time periods must be included.

Option 2
Confirmation. The Contractor can confirm the implementation of the noted
construction and pre-occupancy phase moisture protection methods.

The v3 form only asks for proof of moisture protection, and no photos for option 2. However see this comment from Tristan Roberts below:
Jan 24 2011
“I heard a while back that it was not intentional that photo documentation of only moisture control measures was being asked for, and the form would be updated to be broader. However, I would have expected the form to be updated by now, so I don't know if this is still in the works"

Every reviewer is different, so you could opt for the better safe than sorry strategy and take picks of all SMACNAThe Sheet Metal and Air Conditioning Contractors' National Association (SMACNA) is an international association of union contractors, in the United States, Canada, Australia, and Brazil. requirements. If the date is stamped all the better.

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CAROLINE PIN In charge of environmental certification on a jobsite , EIFFAGE CONSTRUCTION Sep 17 2015 Guest

I'm sorry I didn't find any comment because I looked for "6 photos" and not "photo".

Thank you for your help, your reply was comprehensive and covered many issues.

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Juanita Garcia
Jul 08 2015
Guest

HVAC system wasn't running during construction

Project Location: United States

If the HVAC system wasn't running during construction of a new building, what is the requirement for documentation?
We have dated checklists documenting that the HVAC system wasn't running and that the ductwork on site was sealed along with photos.
Is that documentation sufficient?

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Michelle Halle Stern LEED Fellow, The Green Facilitator Jul 08 2015 LEEDuser Expert

You've met the duct credit requirement if you install MERVMinimum Efficiency Reporting Value (MERV) rating is an American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE) measurement scale which rates the effectiveness of air filters. 13 filters prior to occupancy. I believe you need a cut sheet, but double check the LEED Online form.

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Francis Chua AIA, LEED AP BD+C, Project Architect at NK Architects Jul 08 2015 Guest

Juanita,
You simply select on the online template "Permanently installed air handling units were NOT operated during construction." Done. No need to provide any documentation. By the way, the photos that would be helpful for this credit would be photos that show absorptive material being protected from moisture.

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Nena Elise
Jul 01 2015
LEEDuser Member

Is the credit for during construction, or after envelope is up?

Project Location: United States

We have an issue with a General Contractor on a project. There were poor conditions on the job site captured by images found at: https://www.dropbox.com/sh/b7tbywbp90dklky/AAAvDx-S357jbpmcQ8OYfJqPa?dl=0. These conditions included visible mold, moisture damage on drywall, uncovered materials, and a dirty site. When we brought this issue to the attention of the Owner and Contractor, we presented it in the context that they are not meeting the requirements of IEQ 3.1. The General Contractor proceeded to hire an EHS vendor, which developed a report that purports compliance with IEQ 3.1 does not start until after the envelope is up. Our understanding is that the requirement applies to the entire duration of construction (thus "during construction" in the credit name) and that the Contractor is not complying with the requirements for this credit because the materials stored on-site were not protected from moisture damage, and the housekeeping requirements were not being followed.

What do you think?

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Francis Chua AIA, LEED AP BD+C, Project Architect at NK Architects Jul 01 2015 Guest

Nena,
Was an IAQIndoor air quality: The quality and attributes of indoor air affecting the health and comfort building occupants. IAQ encompasses available fresh air, contaminant levels, acoustics and noise levels, lighting quality, and other factors. Management Plan submitted by the Contractor at the beginning of construction? It should have been. And all subcontractors should be following it. It doesn't matter that the envelope is not up yet. The drywall is damaged. Let's pretend IAQ management begins after the envelope is up. Well, guess what, the drywall is still damaged. As it just sits there, it is absorbing toxic elements and as it is not elevated off the floor, it could sit in a pool of water. There are so many things wrong with these pictures you provided. Ducts not protected, mold growing, garbage everywhere. Housekeeping is part of IAQ management. It's means and methods, but drywall should not be installed if it's going to get wet. That is a no-brainer. That drywall that has mold needs to be cut out and replaced. Who knows how much other installed drywall have mold spores on them that are not visible. This contractor should have their payment reqs held until this is resolved. This is all assuming you have IAQ management in your specifications. And even if you don't, to have mold growing is just not acceptable in new construction, LEED project or not.

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David Hubka Director - Operations, Transwestern Sustainability Services Jul 01 2015 LEEDuser Expert

EQc3.1 applies to the entire duration of construction, not "once envelop is up".

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Nena Elise Jul 01 2015 LEEDuser Member

An IAQIndoor air quality: The quality and attributes of indoor air affecting the health and comfort building occupants. IAQ encompasses available fresh air, contaminant levels, acoustics and noise levels, lighting quality, and other factors. Management Plan was given to the Contractor at the pre-construction meeting, and is in the Specifications for the project. The contractor still does not have the building enclosed, and is continuing construction. The latest job site photos show that HVAC Equipment and electrical panels are now installed in the basement, which continues to receive water damage because there's no roof or windows on the building.

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Michelle Halle Stern LEED Fellow, The Green Facilitator Jul 01 2015 LEEDuser Expert

The intent of the credit is to protect occupants (indoor environmental quality). They cannot be protected if materials with mold and moisture are installed.

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David Hubka Director - Operations, Transwestern Sustainability Services Jul 01 2015 LEEDuser Expert

I concur with both Francis and Michelle.

I'll better phrase my previous response, EQc3.1 applies to the entire duration of construction, which includes "once the envelope is up" and ends upon occupancy of the project building.

If you try and demonstrate that EQc3.1 begins once the envelop is up I would expect the reviewer to deny the credit.

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Nena Elise Jul 03 2015 LEEDuser Member

Others, feel free to weigh in! Good ammunition!

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John Covello LEED AP BD+C, EBOM, LEED and Sustainability Manager Development Management Group
Nov 18 2014
LEEDuser Member

Alternative HVAC duct sealant

Project Location: Thailand

Hi,

My contractor is proposing and alternative method to sealing the air conditioning ducts. They would like to use a foam for the duct end that would be air tight. Their concern is the plastic can rip and have holes in it. Do the SMACNAThe Sheet Metal and Air Conditioning Contractors' National Association (SMACNA) is an international association of union contractors, in the United States, Canada, Australia, and Brazil. guidelines allow for alternative methods of sealing ducts? Thanks.

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Michelle Halle Stern LEED Fellow, The Green Facilitator Nov 19 2014 LEEDuser Expert

This is just my opinion, but I believe that as long as you show that the ducts are sealed, you can use whatever method you think is effective. I believe that it is a performance rather than prescriptive standard.

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Omar ElRawy Building Engineer, LEED AP BD+C EA Building Consultants
Sep 15 2014
Guest

Absorptive Materials

Dear all,
I actually do know what is an absorptive material but only by logic/sense. I need to know if there is a specified list of absorptive materials, or a specific definition by LEED. For example Marble, Plastics and PVC,.. are they absorptive or not?

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Michelle Halle Stern LEED Fellow, The Green Facilitator Sep 15 2014 LEEDuser Expert

I haven't seen LEED define absorptive materials. They also use the word porous. Carpet and drywall are the big ones. I think your logic/sense is a good enough litmus

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Megan Bove
Aug 20 2014
LEEDuser Member

Ductwork

Hi. At what moment of a project does the IAQIndoor air quality: The quality and attributes of indoor air affecting the health and comfort building occupants. IAQ encompasses available fresh air, contaminant levels, acoustics and noise levels, lighting quality, and other factors. reporting need to occur? If there is a project that has only 3 of its 4 exterior walls in place and installation of ductwork is occurring, do you need to start monthly reports or just confirm they are covered etc.? Can you install ductwork while demo is still occurring?

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Michelle Halle Stern LEED Fellow, The Green Facilitator Aug 25 2014 LEEDuser Expert

Reporting interval is a judgment call, but keep in mind the intent of the credit, which is to protect the indoor environment from contamination related to construction. It's not so much about when you report as making an early plan, implementing that plan and then documenting what you have done along the way. Each SMACNAThe Sheet Metal and Air Conditioning Contractors' National Association (SMACNA) is an international association of union contractors, in the United States, Canada, Australia, and Brazil. component has a different critical path. For example if you are storing drywall, you want it protect it from moisture, regardless of how complete the building is. As for your ductwork, you want it covered before anything gets inside it, but that doesn't preclude doing demolition. I would document your ducts as soon as you seal them up, and then at regular intervals to make sure your strategy is still being effective. Photographic evidence is more compelling than just a checklist.

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Nouran Abdel-Rahman
May 13 2014
Guest

Scheduling

We are applying Carpets for flooring. Can we install the carpets, and cover them then install electric fixtures for the ceiling.

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Jul 26 2014 LEEDuser Moderator

Nouran, yes, you can if  this is adequately quality controlled.

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Weld Morse Coastline Consulting Services
Jan 30 2014
Guest

Building Space Flushout

I am working on a Massachusetts public works maintenance facility. it involves 2 separate structures; an office building and a garage. The office building would require flush out procedure, but what about the garage space. I am not sure that it would be occupied full time, it has 2 overhead doors, limited heat and exhaust with no fixed furnishings or interior finishes. Anyone's thoughts. Thank you

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David Hubka Director - Operations, Transwestern Sustainability Services Jan 31 2014 LEEDuser Expert

The gross floor areaGross floor area (based on ASHRAE definition) is the sum of the floor areas of the spaces within the building, including basements, mezzanine and intermediate‐floored tiers, and penthouses wi th headroom height of 7.5 ft (2.2 meters) or greater. Measurements m ust be taken from the exterior 39 faces of exterior walls OR from the centerline of walls separating buildings, OR (for LEED CI certifying spaces) from the centerline of walls separating spaces. Excludes non‐en closed (or non‐enclosable) roofed‐over areas such as exterior covered walkways, porches, terraces or steps, roof overhangs, and similar features. Excludes air shafts, pipe trenches, and chimneys. Excludes floor area dedicated to the parking and circulation of motor vehicles. ( Note that while excluded features may not be part of the gross floor area, and therefore technically not a part of the LEED project building, they may still be required to be a part of the overall LEED project and subject to MPRs, prerequisites, and credits.) listed in Project Information form 2 excludes all parking areas. To maintain consistency between LEED Online templates I would suggest not to include the garage.

Also, the minimum program requirements state that if the project serves less than one annualized FTEFull-time equivalent (FTE) represents a regular building occupant who spends 8 hours a day (40 hours a week) in the project building. Part-time or overtime occupants have FTE values based on their hours per day divided by 8 (or hours per week divided by 40). Transient Occupants can be reported as either daily totals or as part of the FTE. Residential occupancy should be estimated based on the number and size of units. Core and Shell projects should refer to the default occupancy table in the Reference Guide appendix. All occupant assumptions must be consistent across all credits in all categories., optional credits in the IEQ category cannot be achieved.

I would include the above notes on the credit template when documenting compliance with the credit intent.

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Weld Morse Coastline Consulting Services Feb 05 2014 Guest

David
Thank you for the input. I will cross reference this with my HVAC designer.

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Kathy Zarsky Systems Director HOLOS
Dec 11 2013
LEEDuser Member

Unrated filters

We are using Mitsubishi fan coil units on a project and provided a description of the permanent filter type in lieu of the MERVMinimum Efficiency Reporting Value (MERV) rating is an American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE) measurement scale which rates the effectiveness of air filters. rating requested in the table for IEQc3.1. The reviewer has asked us to correct with the MERV rating and provide verification of it. Mitsubishi does not rate their filters, however, so can we use data from another manufacturer that has a similar filter with particulate removal rates indicated and approximate the MERV rating (these would equate to MERV 5 filters)? We are also wanting some clarification about any specific MERV rating requirement (6 or greater) for permanent filters, as an earlier thread seems to indicate there is none. Grateful for any feedback!

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Dylan Connelly Mechanical Engineer, Integral Group Dec 16 2013 LEEDuser Expert

You need to provide MERVMinimum Efficiency Reporting Value (MERV) rating is an American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE) measurement scale which rates the effectiveness of air filters. 8 filters for this credit. The Mitsubishi filters don't sound like they cut it.
Depending on the type of fan coil unit you might be able to use your own filter. If not it is probably a small unit and you could just not run it during construction.

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Kathy Zarsky Systems Director, HOLOS Dec 18 2013 LEEDuser Member

Dylan, thanks for your reply. I don't think my question was clear. We did use MERVMinimum Efficiency Reporting Value (MERV) rating is an American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE) measurement scale which rates the effectiveness of air filters. 8 filters during construction, but now we are seeking clarification on the MERV requirement for the filters used post-occupancy, e.g. the permanent filters. I see that you confirmed our finding of MERV 6 in a post below.
Thank you!

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Francis Chua AIA, LEED AP BD+C, Project Architect at NK Architects Nov 17 2014 Guest

Kathy: straight from the Reference Guide:
"The contractor should replace all filtration media just before occupancy, installing only a single set of filtration media. Note that the requirement for MERVMinimum Efficiency Reporting Value (MERV) rating is an American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE) measurement scale which rates the effectiveness of air filters. 13 rated filters has been moved to IEQ Credit 5: Indoor Chemical and Pollutant Source Control. This credit does not regulate the efficiency of the filters used for the long-term operation of the building".
To answer your question, if you are going for IEQc5, you need to use MERV 13 filters. If you are not going for IEQc5, then it doesn't matter what MERV rating you use, but they still want to know what the rating is.

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Lawrence Lile Chief Engineer, Lile Engineering LLC Jul 24 2016 LEEDuser Member

I believe that mini-splits like Mitsubishi makes cannot qualify for this credit as they are not capable of handling such thick filters. If memory serves me there is actually a CIRCredit Interpretation Ruling. Used by design team members experiencing difficulties in the application of a LEED prerequisite or credit to a project. Typically, difficulties arise when specific issues are not directly addressed by LEED information/guide on this subject but I could be mistaken.

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Noriko Yasuhara Woonerf Inc.
Nov 27 2013
LEEDuser Member

Washable filters

Is the "replace all filtration media immediately prior to occupancy" required for washable filters as well?

Thanks in advance

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Dylan Connelly Mechanical Engineer, Integral Group Dec 16 2013 LEEDuser Expert

I would assume you could just wash the filters prior to occupancy

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R. Ted Krasnesky Manager of Sustainable Construction Pepper Construction Company
Nov 21 2013
LEEDuser Member

New IEQc3.1 Filtration Media Requirements?

I recently opened the LOL V3 NC form for IEQc3.1 and found that Table IEQc3.1-1 has three new columns - CEN Rating, Min Dust Spot Eff and Arrestance in additon to the MERVMinimum Efficiency Reporting Value (MERV) rating is an American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE) measurement scale which rates the effectiveness of air filters. rating. How do I find the LEED addendum for these new requirements?

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Allison Beer McKenzie Architect, Director of Sustainability, SHP Leading Design Nov 21 2013 LEEDuser Expert

Ted- CEN rating and dust spot efficiency/acceptance are alternate compliance methods to MERVMinimum Efficiency Reporting Value (MERV) rating is an American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE) measurement scale which rates the effectiveness of air filters. (mostly for international projects) not additional requirements. So, feel free to continue to only fill out the MERV column. You can find the updated credit text in USGBC's credit library: http://www.usgbc.org/node/1732335?return=/credits

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Jenelle Shapiro Sr. Sustainability Manager Webcor Builders
Nov 12 2013
LEEDuser Member

Are MERV equivalent filters for international projects accepted?

Hello - I'm working on a project in Japan, and the MERVMinimum Efficiency Reporting Value (MERV) rating is an American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE) measurement scale which rates the effectiveness of air filters. rating system is not used here. They have filters that can perform equivalent to MERV 8 and MERV 13 filters, but they don't have the official MERV rating. Have you seen any projects use the approach of MERV equivalence as an approach for projects in Japan or in other international areas?

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Nov 12 2013 LEEDuser Moderator

Megan, check out the credit language above. It was updated by USGBC a little while back to account for filtration standards used outside the U.S. You might find it helpful.

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Maggie Pipek
Sep 04 2013
Guest

HVAC Equipment Installation prior to Roof

The contractor would like to install the HVAC equipment although the roof is not on the building yet. It would seem to me that as long as the contractor protects the equipment from moisture and contaminents this should still be in compliance with LEED requirements. They are not planing on using the equipment. Is there anything I am missing or should warn the contractor about?

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Allison Beer McKenzie Architect, Director of Sustainability, SHP Leading Design Sep 05 2013 LEEDuser Expert

As long as the equipment is well protected, I can't think of any reason why this strategy would not be ok.

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Benjie Herrera LEED AP BD+C ,Homes,IDC,OM
Jul 24 2013
Guest

date of occupancy on the LEED Online Template

Just want to inquire what is an OCCUPANCY DATE in the LEED on line
template? Is it the date the Owner received the Certificate of Occupancy
from governing authority to permit them to occupy and use the building? Or
is it the date after the flush out and the turnover of the building to the Owner and started to move in with the furnitures and fixtures being mobilized to the building? Please advise.

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Susan Walter Specifications Director, Populous Jul 25 2013 LEEDuser Expert

We use the first day that the owner physically occupied and used the space. It isn't unusual for our projects require a lot of time to install equipment after the C of O is issued.

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Benjie Herrera LEED AP BD+C ,Homes,IDC,OM Jul 25 2013 Guest

Thanks Susan. Does it mean that the occupancy date should be the day when the Owner received the C of O and the first day they legally occupied
and used the space?

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Susan Walter Specifications Director, Populous Jul 25 2013 LEEDuser Expert

To me it is the day that staff show up, roll up their sleeves and get to work.

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Benjie Herrera LEED AP BD+C ,Homes,IDC,OM Jul 25 2013 Guest

So it is the first day of work and open for business to the public. right? thanks Susan

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Heather Holdridge Sustainability Coordinator Lake/Flato Architects
Jul 10 2013
LEEDuser Member

Moisture absorption narrative

Would anyone be willing to share the narrative they wrote for the description of methods by which absorptive materials were protected from moisture damage? The contractors I'm working with are having a hard time developing this so it would be helpful to have an example to share. Thanks!

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Julia Weatherby President, Weatherby Design & Co. Engineers Jul 23 2013 Guest

Appendix C of the document at:
http://www.massschoolbuildings.org/sites/default/files/edit-contentfile/...
has a sample spec for protecting materials from moisture. Hope that helps.

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Allison Beer McKenzie Architect, Director of Sustainability, SHP Leading Design Sep 05 2013 LEEDuser Expert

The CHPS appendix is great. The narratives I typically see are as simple as storing absorbent materials inside or under cover. Elevating absorbent off the ground and/or protecting absorbent materials with tarps or other coverings.

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Omar ElRawy Building Engineer, LEED AP BD+C, EA Building Consultants Sep 15 2014 Guest

Julia,
Can you please supply me with another link for the document (appendix C) since that the above link is no more available.

Thanks

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ADRIENN GELESZ LEED AP ABUD Engineering Ltd.
Apr 11 2013
Guest

documentation

Hi,
I have a question regarding the upload requirements:
the form asks for Upload IEQc3.1-1. Provide the IAQIndoor air quality: The quality and attributes of indoor air affecting the health and comfort building occupants. IAQ encompasses available fresh air, contaminant levels, acoustics and noise levels, lighting quality, and other factors. Management Plan for the project, including highlighted IAQ management practices implemented during construction and preoccupancy phases.
After this the form asks whether the plan above contains language highlighting IAQ management practices implemented during construction at the project building.
What I don't understand is what do they mean by "highlighting IAQ management practices implemented during construction".
In my understanding the plan should include all actions that should be implemented and is produced before the start of construction. Does the above sentence mean that this is not enough to be uploaded, but some documentation about the implementation, e.g. checklists, or reports of the actual practices implemented should be uploaded?
Please tell me your experiences.
Many thanks.

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