NC-2009 IEQc3.1: Construction IAQ Management Plan—During Construction

  • NC CI IEQc3.1 Type3 Construction IAQ Diagram
  • Good IAQ benefits everyone

    Managing indoor air quality (IAQIndoor air quality: The quality and attributes of indoor air affecting the health and comfort building occupants. IAQ encompasses available fresh air, contaminant levels, acoustics and noise levels, lighting quality, and other factors.) systematically during construction is becoming more and more common as contractors gain more experience with LEED. It benefits the health of everyone who works on the site, not just the eventual occupants of the building. 

    Not a one-time thing

    Earning this credit can be fairly easy, but it does require careful coordination and buy-in from all the subcontractors and field personnel involved in the project. It’s important to remember that IAQ management is not a one-time compliance event that can be checked off a list—it must be an ongoing effort for the duration of the construction process.

    The contractor should create the IAQ management plan before construction even begins, and check on compliance at various times throughout the process—including collecting photos for credit documentation.

    HVAC wrappingSMACNA guidelines call for measures like wrapping ductwork to prevent dust from entering it during construction. (The commissioning process is supposed to catch poorly coordinated practices like the meeting of the sprinklers and ductwork here.) Photo – YRG Sustainability

    Know the standard

    LEED requires you follow the SMACNA 2007 guidelines. (See Resources.) Chapter 3 of the guide describes Indoor Air Quality (IAQ) management. The standard was udated in 2008, but is virtually identical to the older version referenced in earlier versions of the LEED rating system. Note that although the SMACNA guidelines say they are for "occupied buildings under construction," these guidelines must be used by all LEED projects attempting this credit—occupied or not.

    The SMACNA document offers not a checklist but guidelines. The guide addresses several sources for construction indoor air pollution and offers best practices to address them. It’s a good idea to incorporate as many of the recommended guidelines as are applicable to your project.

    The following are the major areas covered by SMACNA.

    • HVAC Protection: Make sure that dust and construction debris do not accumulate in HVAC ducts. Strategies include wrapping HVAC ducts in plastic and storing ductwork in dust free areas before installing.
    • Source Control: Address the sources of construction pollution and looking for ways to reduce them. Strategies include using low-VOC materials, paints, coatings, adhesives, sealantsA sealant has adhesive properties and is formulated primarily to fill, seal, or waterproof gaps or joints between 2 surfaces. Sealants include sealant primers and caulks. (SCAQMD Rule 1168. )Sealants are used on wood, fabric, paper, corrugated paperboard, plastic foam and other materials with tiny openings, often microscopic, that may absorb or discharge gas or fluid. (as covered in IEQc4.1–4.4); exhausting gas-fueled construction equipment directly to the outside; and storing VOC-containing materials away from absorptive materials.
    • Pathway Interruption: Use negative pressure and or temporary hanging plastic to contain areas that may generate construction dust, for example, wood-cutting and drywall-cutting areas.
    • Housekeeping: Keep a clean work site by sweeping, wet mopping and using low-VOC cleaners.
    • Scheduling: Coordinate the movement of occupants to minimize their exposure to construction debris; schedule installation of absorptive materials to limit the materials’ exposure to VOCsA volatile organic compounds (VOCs) is a carbon compound that vaporizes (becomes a gas) at normal room temperatures. VOCs contribute to air pollution directly and through atmospheric photochemical reactions (excluding carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, carbonic acid, metallic carbides and carbonates, and ammonium carbonate) to produce secondary air pollutants, principally ozone and peroxyacetyl nitrate. and moisture.

     Poorly covered ductsHVAC components that are poorly protected from dust and construction debris, as in this photo, can cause equpiment malfunctions and poor IAQ during occupancy.

    More than just SMACNA

    In addition to the SMACNA requirements your project will be required to protect absorptive material from moisture. This includes any absorptive materials, like drywall, carpet, and ceiling tiles. Take pictures of this for documentation.

    If HVAC equipment will be used during construction, you will need to install MERVMinimum efficiency reporting value. 8 filters and replace them before the building is occupied.

     

Legend

  • Best Practices
  • Gotcha
  • Action Steps
  • Cost Tip

Construction Documents

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  • This credit relies heavily on SMACNA’s best-practice management guide that addresses construction IAQ management in five areas: HVAC protection, source control, pathway interruption, housekeeping, and scheduling. (See Resources.) Develop the project IAQ plan for use throughout construction. You can use the customizable IAQ plan provided by LEEDuser—see the Documentation Toolkit.


  • Poorly covered HVAC ductsWith all of the SMACNA guidelines, there is a right way to do it—and then there are the other ways, like this poorly covered ductwork. Do it right, and document it with photos. Photo – YRG SustainabilityYour project IAQ plan must address all five areas of the SMACNA guide, protection of absorptive materials, and use of MERV 8 filters (if applicable). Although you’re not required to employ every SMACNA guideline, it's a good idea to implement as many of the guidelines as possible unless you can reasonably justify not doing so. Projects that implement only a few SMACNA guidelines run the risk of having the credit rejected during LEED review. For example, it would be a red flag if your HVAC units arrived from the manufacturer wrapped in plastic, but you didn’t cover open-ended ducts to protect them once they were installed, or didn’t have any photos to back up the claim that ducts arrived wrapped.


  • The owner and design team need to ensure that IAQ guidelines, such as an IAQ plan, HVAC protection, source control, pathway interruption, housekeeping, and scheduling, have been integrated into the construction specifications.    


  • Masterspec offers sample LEED specifications for construction documents. It includes an entire section specific to IAQ management. (See Resources.) The contractor also needs to protect absorptive material from moisture. This is for both installed and stored absorptive materials, like drywall, carpet, and ceiling tiles. You should also take pictures of this for documentation. If HVAC equipment will be used during construction, you will need to install MERV 8 filters and replace them before the building is occupied.

     


  • Construction specifications can include IAQ-related items such as procedures to follow, a sample IAQ plan, and VOC limits on materials related to IEQc4: Low-Emitting Materials, no-smoking policies, the request to use dustless equipment, a request to have ductwork arrive pre-wrapped, and more.


  • Some contractors may charge a premium for implementing and documenting this credit, but in general, added costs should be minor as more firms start incorporating these as standard best practices. 


  • Hiring construction teams with LEED experience is helpful, as is reviewing LEED requirements and responsibilities with the contractor during the bidding process.


  • Accountability is key to successfully implementing an IAQ plan. Ensure that subcontractors are required implement their parts of the IAQ plan, and to get specific processes and materials approved. 

Construction

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  • Preparation Before Construction Begins


  • The general contractor (GC) should go over all LEED-specific issues—including IAQ management, the role of low-emitting materials, environmental materials tracking tools, construction waste management, and more—at an orientation meeting.


  • It’s a good idea for the GC to meet with subcontractors to reinforce the LEED responsibilities related specifically to their trades. This exercise helps to build trust and is crucial for obtaining buy-in from all participants in the process.


  • Enabling coordination and communication among the GC, subcontractors, and the design team early in the process can minimize scheduling delays and pushback from subcontractors.


  • The GC distributes the Indoor Air Quality plan outlining procedures and best practices to be distributed to subcontractors prior to the construction phase. The plan should clearly identify who is responsible for implementing each component of the plan—for example, “Wrapping installed open-ended HVAC ductwork is the responsibility of the mechanical contractor,” and “Quality control is the responsibility of the general contractor.” 


  • Develop a checklist for weekly activities that lists SMACNA guidelines, protection of absorptive material, and use of MERV 8 filters along with related to-do items, such as taking photographs to document the IAQ strategies. It’s a convenient way to stay on top of required tasks, and the checklist can be used at weekly meetings and posted around the site. See the Documentation Toolkit for a sample checklist.


  • During Construction


  • The contractor and subs should ensure that SMACNA practices are being followed. Each of the five major SMACNA areas is addressed in detail below.  


  • Decide whether HVAC units will be used during construction. If so, ensure that MERV 8 filters have been purchased and are used throughout the site. Remember that any filters used during construction must be replaced prior to occupancy.


  • Post copies of the IAQ plan in various places around the construction site to ensure that the plan is being followed. Hang signs that remind subcontractors to follow IAQ practices such as covering exposed ductwork with plastic, wet mopping regularly, and using low-VOC products and other SMACNA practices. See the Documentation Toolkit for sample signage.


  • Assign an IAQ manager to assist the GC. This person can run spot-checks for SMACNA and other best-practice compliance.  


  • HVAC Protection


  • Follow SMACNA strategies for HVAC protection that are appropriate to your project. These include items such as the following:

    • Wrapped, stored ductworkThis ductwork was ordered wrapped, and was stored away from construction work until installation. Photo – YRG Sustainabilitywrapping ductwork and or ventilation equipment in plastic once it arrives on site;
    • ordering ductwork pre-wrapped in plastic before it is delivered to the site;
    • placing ductwork or ventilation equipment in a room away from construction work to protect it from dust until it is installed and covered;
    • covering exposed grilles with plastic once ductwork is installed;
    • and laying plastic over underfloor air systems to keep out construction debris.

  • Ordering ductwork pre-wrapped in plastic or having open grilles sealed once installed may add slightly to costs, but pre-wrapped ductwork, for example, makes HVAC protection easy to achieve.


  • Source Control


  • Follow SMACNA strategies for source control that are appropriate to your project. These include items such as the following.

    • For construction materials storage, do not use VOC controlThis project used low-emitting paints, sealants, and adhesives, and stored them in a closet to protect air quality. Photo – YRG Sustainabilitymechanical rooms or air-mixing rooms as many products give off gases that can be absorbed by other materials or could be distributed to other areas through the ventilation system.
    • Use only low-emitting adhesives; sealants; paints, coatings; flooring products; composite woods; and furniture, wall, and ceiling systems. 
    • When cleaning the construction space, use low-VOC cleaners.
    • Combustion-based construction equipment used in the interior of a building should be exhausted directly to the outside. Long-snake exhaust pipes can be attached to this type of equipment for easy exhausting out of windows.
    • When combustion-based, stand-alone heating units are used for supplemental heating during construction, it may be best to keep the heating units outdoors to exhaust and pump the heat to the indoors.

  • Using low-emitting materials helps projects gain the Low-Emitting Materials series of credits—IEQc4.1: Adhesive and Sealants, IEQc4.2: Paints and Coatings, IEQc4.3: Flooring Systems, and IEQc4.4: Composite Wood and Agrifiber Products.


  • Using low-VOC construction materials and cleaning products helps to pass the air-quality test for IEQc3.2: Construction IAQ Management Plan Before Occupancy


  • Using low-VOC products—adhesives, sealants, paints, coatings, flooring systems, and composite wood—should add little to no extra cost. 


  • It is a good idea for the GC to set up a supervisory mechanism, such as designating an IAQ manager to run quality control checks and to ensure that the proper products and procedures are being used. 


  • The IAQ management plan should specifically state who is responsible for ensuring that low-VOC materials are used onsite, and the GC should verify that the products and procedures being used by each subcontractor are in compliance.


  • Pathway Interruption


  • Follow SMACNA strategies for pathway interruption that are appropriate to your project. These include items such as the following:

    • Elevator shaftsThe base-building elevator shafts were sealed on this project to prevent movement of dust. Photo – YRG SustainabilityTemporary barriers and self-contained dustless apparatus, such as concrete grinders and drywall sanders, can be helpful to isolate and protect finished construction areas from areas that are still under construction. Isolate construction dust produced by activities like cutting drywall or wood. 
    • Separate construction zones from occupied zones.

  • Contain construction air pollution by exhausting air to create negative pressure in construction areas. 


  • Plastic barriers are the most inexpensive, but drywall or cloth partitions can be used as well.


  • Housekeeping


  • Follow SMACNA strategies for housekeeping that are appropriate to your project. These include items such as the following:

    • Wet moppingWet mopping on a daily basis during construction keeps down dust. Photo – YRG SustainabilityWet mopping helps keep construction dust particles from becoming airborne.
    • Frequent sweeping helps control construction dust and keeps construction materials free of debris.

  • Housekeeping is a no- to low-cost measure and is simple to implement.  


  • These practices may be slightly time-consuming, but will help to create a healthier working environment for all the construction workers onsite on a daily basis. Communicating this point frequently to everyone on the site can help to build compliance. 


  • Scheduling


  • Carefully schedule construction and any necessary occupant moves in a manner that reduces occupant exposure to construction pollution. 


  • Carefully examine the sequencing of material installation before construction begins.  Schedule installation to protect absorptive materials from construction pollution. For example, do not store or install acoustic ceiling tiles before painting occurs or flooring products are installed because the ceiling tiles will absorb the off-gassing paint or floor adhesives and will contaminate the air over a longer time period. This could also compromise the project’s ability to attain IEQc3.2: Construction IAQ Management Plan—Before Occupancy. 


  • Scheduling is a no-cost measure but needs to be coordinated before construction begins.


  • Wrap-Up and Documentation


  • Take photos throughout the construction process to demonstrate that your IAQ plan has been followed. There is no specific number of photos required, but they must be taken at two or more different stages of the project. For reference, prior to 2009 this credit required at least 16 photos—see the Documentation Toolkit for examples.


  • All five SMACNA control measures have to be documented in a photo log. It is easy to take pictures of covered ducts, but don’t forget to also take photos of more process-oriented strategies such as housekeeping and pathway interruption. The pictures should clearly show all the control measures adopted during construction. Photos should be submitted with a brief description, the time and date, and an indication of what SMACNA practice is demonstrated. 


  • MERV 8 filtersThese MERV 8 filters were installed prior to initial system start-up, and replaced prior to occupancy. Photo – YRG SustainabilityIf the building’s air handlers are used, replace all filters (MERV 8) required during construction with new filters—after construction and before occupants move into the space.


  • Replace construction filters with MERV 13 filters if the project is also attempting to earn credit for IEQc5: Indoor Environmental Pollutant Source Control.


  • It is usually a good idea to do a “mini air flush” (if your project is not attempting IEQc3.2) before occupancy to help remove any lingering VOCs from the construction process. This can be as simple as putting industrial sized fans in the window and pumping in fresh air overnight or running the HVAC exhaust on high for a few days. (See IEQc3.2: Construction Indoor Air Quality Plan—Before Occupancy if the team wants to do a full flush-out for an additional LEED point.)


  • Fill out the LEED Online form and upload the IAQ plan, photos with SMACNA descriptions, and cut sheets of MERV filters used onsite during construction, if air handlers were used.


  • Alternatives to installing MERV 8 filters include not using the building HVAC units, bringing in a stand-alone temporary system, or using natural ventilation.

Operations & Maintenance

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  • O&M staff can use the IAQ plan for future renovations.

  • USGBC

    Excerpted from LEED 2009 for New Construction and Major Renovations

    IEQ Credit 3.1: Construction IAQ management plan - during construction

    1 Point

    Intent

    To reduce indoor air quality (IAQIndoor air quality: The quality and attributes of indoor air affecting the health and comfort building occupants. IAQ encompasses available fresh air, contaminant levels, acoustics and noise levels, lighting quality, and other factors.) problems resulting from construction or renovation and promote the comfort and well-being of construction workers and building occupants.

    Requirements

    Develop and implement an IAQIndoor air quality: The quality and attributes of indoor air affecting the health and comfort building occupants. IAQ encompasses available fresh air, contaminant levels, acoustics and noise levels, lighting quality, and other factors. management plan for the construction and preoccupancy phases of the building as follows:

    • During construction, meet or exceed the recommended control measures of the Sheet Metal and Air Conditioning National Contractors Association (SMACNA) IAQ Guidelines For Occupied Buildings Under Construction, 2nd Edition 2007, ANSI/ SMACNA 008-2008 (Chapter 3).
    • Protect stored on-site and installed absorptive materials from moisture damage.
    • If permanently installed air handlers are used during construction, filtration media must be used at each return air grille that meets one of the following criteria below. Replace all filtration media immediately prior to occupancy.
      • Filtration media with a minimum efficiency reporting value (MERVMinimum efficiency reporting value.) of 8 as determined by ASHRAE Standard 52.2-1999 (with errata but without addenda1)
      • Filtration media is Class F5 or higher, as defined by CEN Standard EN 779-2002, Particulate air filters for general ventilation, Determination of the filtration performance
      • Filtration media with a minimum dust spot efficiency of 30% or higher and greater than

        90% arrestance on a particle size of 3–10 µg

    Potential Technologies & Strategies

     Adopt an IAQIndoor air quality: The quality and attributes of indoor air affecting the health and comfort building occupants. IAQ encompasses available fresh air, contaminant levels, acoustics and noise levels, lighting quality, and other factors. management plan to protect the heating, ventilating and air conditioning (HVAC) system during construction, control pollutant sources and interrupt contamination pathways. Sequence the installation of materials to avoid contamination of absorptive materials, such as insulation, carpeting, ceiling tile and gypsum wallboard. Coordinate with IEQ Credit 3.2: Construction IAQ Management PlanA construction IAQ management plan outlines measures to minimize contamination in a specific project building during construction and describes procedures to flush the building of contaminants prior to occupancy. — Before Occupancy and IEQ Credit 5: Indoor Chemical & Pollutant Source Control to determine the appropriate specifications and schedules for filtration media.

    If possible, avoid using permanently installed air handlers for temporary heating/cooling during construction. Consult the LEED Reference Guide for Green Building Design and Construction, 2009 Edition for more detailed information on how to ensure the well-being of construction workers and building occupants if permanently installed air handlers must be used during construction.

Technical Guides

IEQ Space Matrix - 2nd Edition

This updated version of the spreadsheet categories dozens of specific space types according to how they should be applied under various IEQ credits. This document is essential if you have questions about how various unique space types should be treated. Up to date, 2nd Edition.


U.S. EPA Controlling Pollutants and Sources

The EPA website provides information regarding typical sources of indoor and outdoor pollutants and methods for resolving indoor air quality concerns. Find detailed information on exhaust or spot ventilation practices during construction.


IEQ Space Matrix - 1st Ed.

This spreadsheet categories dozens of specific space types according to how they should be applied under various IEQ credits. This document is essential if you have questions about how various unique space types should be treated.  This is the 1st edition.

Publications

California Air Resources Board Indoor Air Pollution Report, July 2005

This report, released in July 2005, covers the significant health effects caused by indoor air pollution, including respiratory illness and disease, asthma attacks, cancer, and premature death. The report describes the health effects, sources, and concentrations of indoor air pollutants; existing regulations, guidelines, and practices for indoor air pollution; and ways to prevent and reduce indoor air pollution.


The State of Washington Program and IAQ Standards

This standard was the first state-initiated program to ensure the design of buildings with acceptable IAQIndoor air quality: The quality and attributes of indoor air affecting the health and comfort building occupants. IAQ encompasses available fresh air, contaminant levels, acoustics and noise levels, lighting quality, and other factors..


Indoor Air Quality: A Facility Manager’s Guide, published by the Construction Technology Centre Atlantic

A comprehensive review of indoor air quality issues and solutions.

Organizations

Sheet Metal and Air Conditioning Contractors’ National Association, Inc. (SMACNA)

SMACNA is an international organization that developed guidelines for maintaining healthful indoor air quality during demolitions, renovations, and construction. The professional trade association publishes the referenced standard as well as Indoor Air Quality: A Systems Approach, a comprehensive document that covers air pollutant sources, control measures, IAQIndoor air quality: The quality and attributes of indoor air affecting the health and comfort building occupants. IAQ encompasses available fresh air, contaminant levels, acoustics and noise levels, lighting quality, and other factors. process management, quality control and documentation, interpersonal communication , sample projects, tables, references, resources, and checklists.


Masterspec

Masterspec offers guidance on how to write LEED specifications into construction documents. It includes an entire section specific to IAQIndoor air quality: The quality and attributes of indoor air affecting the health and comfort building occupants. IAQ encompasses available fresh air, contaminant levels, acoustics and noise levels, lighting quality, and other factors. management.

Construction IAQ Management Plan

The Indoor Air Quality Management Plan outlines procedures and best practices covering all five areas of SMACNA guidelines. Shown here is a template formatted with the sections the IAQIndoor air quality: The quality and attributes of indoor air affecting the health and comfort building occupants. IAQ encompasses available fresh air, contaminant levels, acoustics and noise levels, lighting quality, and other factors. plan should cover and giving guidance on how to customize the template to develop your own IAQ plan. Also shown here is a sample IAQ plan from a Harvard University project.

Weekly IAQ Checklist

A checklist like this can be used at regular meetings between the GC and subcontractors to ensure that IAQIndoor air quality: The quality and attributes of indoor air affecting the health and comfort building occupants. IAQ encompasses available fresh air, contaminant levels, acoustics and noise levels, lighting quality, and other factors. management plan measures are being followed.

IAQ Photo Documentation

All five SMACNA control measures have to be documented in a photo log. It is easy to take pictures of covered ducts, but don’t forget to also take photos of more process-oriented strategies such as housekeeping and pathway interruption. The pictures should clearly show all the control measures adopted during construction. Photos should be submitted with a brief description, the time and date, and an indication of what SMACNA practice is demonstrated.

Jobsite Signage

Use jobsite signage like this sample to remind contractors of SMACNA requirements for this credit.

LEED Online Forms: NC-2009 IEQ

The following links take you to the public, informational versions of the dynamic LEED Online forms for each NC-2009 IEQ credit. You'll need to fill out the live versions of these forms on LEED Online for each credit you hope to earn.

Version 4 forms (newest):

Version 3 forms:

These links are posted by LEEDuser with USGBC's permission. USGBC has certain usage restrictions for these forms; for more information, visit LEED Online and click "Sample Forms Download."

Construction Submittal

HardhatDocumentation for this credit is part of the Construction Phase submittal.

70 Comments

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Megan White Sustainability Manager Webcor Builders
Nov 12 2013
LEEDuser Member
126 Thumbs Up

Are MERV equivalent filters for international projects accepted?

Hello - I'm working on a project in Japan, and the MERVMinimum efficiency reporting value. rating system is not used here. They have filters that can perform equivalent to MERV 8 and MERV 13 filters, but they don't have the official MERV rating. Have you seen any projects use the approach of MERV equivalence as an approach for projects in Japan or in other international areas?

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Nov 12 2013 LEEDuser Moderator

Megan, check out the credit language above. It was updated by USGBC a little while back to account for filtration standards used outside the U.S. You might find it helpful.

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Maggie Pipek
Sep 04 2013
Guest
9 Thumbs Up

HVAC Equipment Installation prior to Roof

The contractor would like to install the HVAC equipment although the roof is not on the building yet. It would seem to me that as long as the contractor protects the equipment from moisture and contaminents this should still be in compliance with LEED requirements. They are not planing on using the equipment. Is there anything I am missing or should warn the contractor about?

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Allison Beer McKenzie Architect, Director of Sustainability, SHP Leading Design Sep 05 2013 LEEDuser Expert 5248 Thumbs Up

As long as the equipment is well protected, I can't think of any reason why this strategy would not be ok.

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Benj Herrera LEED AP BD+C
Jul 24 2013
Guest
446 Thumbs Up

date of occupancy on the LEED Online Template

Just want to inquire what is an OCCUPANCY DATE in the LEED on line
template? Is it the date the Owner received the Certificate of Occupancy
from governing authority to permit them to occupy and use the building? Or
is it the date after the flush out and the turnover of the building to the Owner and started to move in with the furnitures and fixtures being mobilized to the building? Please advise.

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Susan Walter Sr Project Architect, Wilmot/Sanz Jul 25 2013 LEEDuser Expert 9927 Thumbs Up

We use the first day that the owner physically occupied and used the space. It isn't unusual for our projects require a lot of time to install equipment after the C of O is issued.

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Benj Herrera LEED AP BD+C Jul 25 2013 Guest 446 Thumbs Up

Thanks Susan. Does it mean that the occupancy date should be the day when the Owner received the C of O and the first day they legally occupied
and used the space?

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Susan Walter Sr Project Architect, Wilmot/Sanz Jul 25 2013 LEEDuser Expert 9927 Thumbs Up

To me it is the day that staff show up, roll up their sleeves and get to work.

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Benj Herrera LEED AP BD+C Jul 25 2013 Guest 446 Thumbs Up

So it is the first day of work and open for business to the public. right? thanks Susan

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Heather Holdridge Sustainability Coordinator Lake/Flato Architects
Jul 10 2013
LEEDuser Member
1001 Thumbs Up

Moisture absorption narrative

Would anyone be willing to share the narrative they wrote for the description of methods by which absorptive materials were protected from moisture damage? The contractors I'm working with are having a hard time developing this so it would be helpful to have an example to share. Thanks!

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Julia Weatherby Senior Mechanical Engineer, Lindgren & Sharples, P.C. Jul 23 2013 LEEDuser Member 405 Thumbs Up

Appendix C of the document at:
http://www.massschoolbuildings.org/sites/default/files/edit-contentfile/...
has a sample spec for protecting materials from moisture. Hope that helps.

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Allison Beer McKenzie Architect, Director of Sustainability, SHP Leading Design Sep 05 2013 LEEDuser Expert 5248 Thumbs Up

The CHPS appendix is great. The narratives I typically see are as simple as storing absorbent materials inside or under cover. Elevating absorbent off the ground and/or protecting absorbent materials with tarps or other coverings.

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ADRIENN GELESZ LEED AP ABUD Engineering Ltd.
Apr 11 2013
LEEDuser Member
518 Thumbs Up

documentation

Hi,
I have a question regarding the upload requirements:
the form asks for Upload IEQc3.1-1. Provide the IAQIndoor air quality: The quality and attributes of indoor air affecting the health and comfort building occupants. IAQ encompasses available fresh air, contaminant levels, acoustics and noise levels, lighting quality, and other factors. Management Plan for the project, including highlighted IAQ management practices implemented during construction and preoccupancy phases.
After this the form asks whether the plan above contains language highlighting IAQ management practices implemented during construction at the project building.
What I don't understand is what do they mean by "highlighting IAQ management practices implemented during construction".
In my understanding the plan should include all actions that should be implemented and is produced before the start of construction. Does the above sentence mean that this is not enough to be uploaded, but some documentation about the implementation, e.g. checklists, or reports of the actual practices implemented should be uploaded?
Please tell me your experiences.
Many thanks.

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Allison Beer McKenzie Architect, Director of Sustainability, SHP Leading Design Apr 11 2013 LEEDuser Expert 5248 Thumbs Up

Our experience has been that as long as your plan is well developed and contains the steps the construction team must follow during construction for the 6 areas of concern you will be fine just uploading it. This form has changed several times over the years. Some forms ask you to include a narrative from the construction team on how the plan was actually implemented. If that is the case with your form, simply write and include a description of what was actually done during construction(these actions should, of course, be in line with your plan).

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Michael E. Edmonds-Bauer Edmonds International
Mar 05 2013
LEEDuser Member
822 Thumbs Up

LEED-NC for a residential building

We have a residential project that wishes to apply for LEED-NC, due to climate conditions no HVAC system will be implemented and 100% of ventilation will be natural (no mechanical equipment at all).

Can EQc3.1 still be achieved? There won't be HVAC protection since there is no HVAC equiment, however source control, pathway interruption, scheduling and housekeeping can totally be implemented.

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Mar 05 2013 LEEDuser Moderator

Michael, if one of the measures in this credit isn't applicable to your project, you can simply apply the other measures in order to meet the credit requirements.

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Naten Maniktala
Dec 03 2012
LEEDuser Member
128 Thumbs Up

Plenum Return Systems

Hi All,

Compliance with this credit in fully ducted return systems has been straight forward, however, the LEED Reference Guide is not too clear on how exactly open plenum return systems are to be addressed. The Reference Guide states that "If an unducted plenum over the construction zone must be used, the team should isolate it by having all ceiling tiles in place". It is not clear if the MERVMinimum efficiency reporting value. 8 filtration media should be installed at the return air grilles, or at the return duct mains to the air handling unit. It seems that placing the MERV 8 filters at each RA grille may not be the best solution, as the plenum will still accumulate dust during construction and during occupancy. It seems that the more prudent and cost effective solution would be to place MERV 8 filtration media at the return air mains to each air handling unit. Does anyone have experience with this? Thanks!

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Dylan Connelly Mechanical Engineer, Integral Group Mar 20 2013 LEEDuser Expert 4954 Thumbs Up

Naten,

MERVMinimum efficiency reporting value. 8 filtration media at the RA mains has been sufficient on all of our projects with plenum return.

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Marcia Weekes LEED Coordinator Ecostrategic Construction Solutions
Nov 28 2012
LEEDuser Member
6 Thumbs Up

MERV-8 Filtration

I was under the impression that every LEED project would need to demonstrate use of MERVMinimum efficiency reporting value. 8 filtration during construction due to the fact that building commissioning is a prerequisite of LEED and startup, TAB and commissioning constitutes use of the HVAC equipment during construction. Is this assumption incorrect?

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Ann Palermo Jan 10 2013 Guest 33 Thumbs Up

Hi,

I am also under this impression - can anyone confirm Marcia's assumption above?

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Julia Weatherby Senior Mechanical Engineer, Lindgren & Sharples, P.C. Jan 15 2013 LEEDuser Member 405 Thumbs Up

As a matter of practicality, you are probably right that startup, TAB, and commissioning will normally occur during construction, so it would not be a bad idea to require documentation of MERVMinimum efficiency reporting value. 8 filters during construction for all projects. However, based on the flush out reference guide language for Credit 3.2 and on past experience, I believe that if balancing and commissioning are done after completion of all punch list items, after installation of all finishes, and after final cleaning, then the operation of the HVAC equipment would not be defined as "during construction".

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Charles Popeck Principal Green Ideas, Inc.
Nov 15 2012
LEEDuser Member
39 Thumbs Up

Clean Room Protocol and SMACNA standards

We are currently working on a LEED project where a significant portion of the finished space will classify as “Clean Room” under ISO 14644-1. It is our understanding that Clean Room standards are much more rigorous than SMACNA standards; however, we don’t have any previous experience with Clean Room requirements. With our limited experience in this area, we don’t want to prompt action on the part of the contractor (& Subs) to fulfill LEED requirements that will conflict with Clean Room and ISO 14644-1 requirement. Does anyone have any experience working on a LEED project which included Clean Rooms? If so, how do the standards compare?

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Heather Holdridge Sustainability Coordinator Lake/Flato Architects
Nov 01 2012
LEEDuser Member
1001 Thumbs Up

Natural ventilation for 100% outside air?

SMACNA standard recommends under Pathway Interruption (IAQIndoor air quality: The quality and attributes of indoor air affecting the health and comfort building occupants. IAQ encompasses available fresh air, contaminant levels, acoustics and noise levels, lighting quality, and other factors. Management Plan) that : "Depending on weather conditions, the contractor should ventilate using 100% outside air to exhaust contaminated air directly to the outside during installation of VOC-emitting materials". Does this mean that natural ventilation is sufficient to comply or do we still need to have mechanical equipment such as fans?

If we are using all low VOC materials, are they still considered as "VOC emitting"?

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Dylan Connelly Mechanical Engineer, Integral Group Nov 02 2012 LEEDuser Expert 4954 Thumbs Up

Low VOC materials still emit VOCsA volatile organic compounds (VOCs) is a carbon compound that vaporizes (becomes a gas) at normal room temperatures. VOCs contribute to air pollution directly and through atmospheric photochemical reactions (excluding carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, carbonic acid, metallic carbides and carbonates, and ammonium carbonate) to produce secondary air pollutants, principally ozone and peroxyacetyl nitrate.. Natural ventilation would be acceptable. However, more often I see contractors using temporary exhaust fans.

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Trever Shelden via Greengrade LEED Management Software
Oct 30 2012
Guest
225 Thumbs Up

Temporary Natural Gas Winter Heat

We are currently working on a LEED project where we are using temporary direct fire natural gas heaters for winter heat. The project is approximately 65,000 square feet and we are using 2,000,000 BTUA unit of energy consumed by or delivered to a building. A Btu is an acronym for British thermal unit and is defined as the amount of energy required to increase the temperature of 1 pound of water by 1 degree Fahrenheit, at normal atmospheric pressure. Energy consumption is expressed in Btu to allow for consumption comparisons among fuels that are measured in different units. of gas heating. The heaters will be used for 5 to 6 months depending on ambient temperatureTemperature of the surrounding air or other medium. (EPA). How will this affect this credit and our IAQIndoor air quality: The quality and attributes of indoor air affecting the health and comfort building occupants. IAQ encompasses available fresh air, contaminant levels, acoustics and noise levels, lighting quality, and other factors. management plan?

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Nov 23 2012 LEEDuser Moderator

Trever, I don't think temporary heaters have a major impact on this credit. SImply review the requirements, and SMACNA measures, and make sure the heaters are taken into account on any relevant points.

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Candice Rogers Paladin, Inc
Aug 28 2012
LEEDuser Member
161 Thumbs Up

Ductwork Cleaning Standards

My Mechancial Contractor for a project submitted an IAQIndoor air quality: The quality and attributes of indoor air affecting the health and comfort building occupants. IAQ encompasses available fresh air, contaminant levels, acoustics and noise levels, lighting quality, and other factors. Plan referencing the National Air Duct Cleaning Association's procedures for cleaning ductwork. I know that the IEQc3.1 is based on SMACNA. Any issue with the Contractor using the NADCA standard for cleaning?

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David Posada Sustainability Manager, GBD Architects Aug 28 2012 LEEDuser Expert 14465 Thumbs Up

The NADCA standard goes into greater detail on duct cleaning methods than SMACNA Chapter 3 especially in definitions, evaluation methods, cleaning and protection measures.

I haven't looked at the NADCA standard in enough detail to see if it contradicts any of the SMACNA requirements, in whuch case SMACNA would prevail. SMACNA Chapter 3 addresses other areas than just duct cleaning such as source control, protection of materials during construction, scheduling, etc.

If the IAQIndoor air quality: The quality and attributes of indoor air affecting the health and comfort building occupants. IAQ encompasses available fresh air, contaminant levels, acoustics and noise levels, lighting quality, and other factors. plan is based only on the NADCA standard it might not be complete in all areas, though it may be very thorough in addressing duct cleaning. If you find that the IAQ plan covers all the SMACNA requirements, I don't foresee an issue following the NADCA standard as well.

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angela cardwell
May 09 2012
LEEDuser Member
46 Thumbs Up

Date and Time Stamped Photos

The LEEDonline forms request photo documentation with Date and Time stamps. My camera only has the capability for the date stamp but not the time stamp. How stringent will the LEED reviewer be if all my photos contain the dates (showing multiple stages of the project) but not the time?

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Allison Beer McKenzie Architect, Director of Sustainability, SHP Leading Design May 23 2012 LEEDuser Expert 5248 Thumbs Up

Angela- almost all of the photos that we have ever submitted for this credit are not time or date stamped and we have never had a reviewer raise a question. I seriously doubt that you will have any problem if you have the date but not the time. I have, however, been surprised before. Reviewers seem to come up with new hot button issues occasionally and recently I have gotten some comments that I have never seen before.

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Steve Loppnow Sustainability Manager, YR&G Jun 08 2012 LEEDuser Expert 2288 Thumbs Up

You can also create your own "date-stamps" by including dates in the title of the photo, and stating the fact that your camera doesn't have the functionality that the form requests. That has worked for me in the past.

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Green Builder Employee Consulting Firm
May 09 2012
LEEDuser Member
720 Thumbs Up

additional covers at return air grilles

In anticipation for a large dust kick-up during finish installation, our project is looking into placing an additional cloth filter on the return air grilles (in addition to the MERVMinimum efficiency reporting value. 8 filter). Does anyone have any temporary filter suggestions? Thanks!

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Susan Walter Sr Project Architect, Wilmot/Sanz May 18 2012 LEEDuser Expert 9927 Thumbs Up

Wouldn't it be better to increase the MERVMinimum efficiency reporting value. rating on the filter or blocking them off completely during the dust producing activities? I'm not sure the cloth would do much or have a verifiable benefit. While you would meet the credit letter of the law with only MERV 8, additional protections when warranted are a good thing.

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Thomas Boyd MEP Construction Manager Tonn and Blank Construction, LLC
Apr 11 2012
Guest
234 Thumbs Up

Two options for compliance (pictures or signature)? IEQ cr3.1

Hello all - Our construction team has completed our project. I am going through some of the photographs that our company took during construction.

Our team did a good job taking photographs of how our sheet metal installer cleaned duct before it was installed and covering it when installation was completed. Unfortunately, we didn't take too many photos of drywall setting on pallets under cover or similar absorptive materials under cover.

Our construction approach utilizes "drying in" the building before installing absorptive materials. After building was dried in, our subs were directed to stock floors and install respective absorptive materials.

Does anyone have LEED experience utilizing the electronic signature for compliance? Any problems associated with utilizing this path?

thanks- Tom

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Samantha Harrell LEED Project Reviewer certificate holder Apr 11 2012 Guest 2105 Thumbs Up

Hi Tom,

There should be no issues with using this compliance path, as long is the detailed narrative is also provided. I believe that's partially why this path exists, for cases where photo documentation is lost or lacking.

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Peter Warren Principal, Warren Architecture Aug 08 2012 LEEDuser Member 102 Thumbs Up

My experience with this is limited, and I can relate to Tom's situation of having limited photos to choose from. My question is - How can the "narrative + signature" be an equivalent to the "SMACNA-practices photo log" when the narrative only asks about moisture protection and the latter seeks to verify that a much broader range of practices (Source, Pathway, Housekeeping, Scheduling) was followed. Is it really accepted as an equivalent alternative if our narrative says, "yeah we kept it dry" and the contractor attests to this?

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Steve Loppnow Sustainability Manager YR&G
Jan 12 2012
LEEDuser Expert
2288 Thumbs Up

EQc3, EQc5 and filtration requirements

I'd like to confirm that if a project is pursuing EQc5, that they must use MERVMinimum efficiency reporting value. 13 filters for flush-out but can still use MERV 8 filters on equipment that is operated during construction. Anyone have experience that contradicts this? Thanks!

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Dylan Connelly Mechanical Engineer, Integral Group Feb 03 2012 LEEDuser Expert 4954 Thumbs Up

You don't need MERVMinimum efficiency reporting value. 13 filters for the flush out. Only MERV 8. Then for EQc5 you would need to use MERV 13 where required by that credit.

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Mech Engineer LEED AP BD+C Jul 23 2013 Guest 4 Thumbs Up

Since there was the addendum for IEQc5 to remove the MERVMinimum efficiency reporting value. 13 at all returns, I have been searching for where the filtration requirement would be for non-outdoor air units. On one hand IEQc3 does say "Replace all filtration", which I could see someone interpreting to mean to replace MERV 8 with MERV 8, but it does not say really say what MERV to replace the MERV 8 with. And we know that for outdoor air units serving occupied spacesOccupied Spaces are defined as enclosed spaces that can accommodate human activities. Occupied spaces are further classified as regularly occupied or non-regularly occupied spaces based on the duration of the occupancy, individual or multi-occupant based on the quantity of occupants, and densely or non-densely occupied spaces based upon the concentration of occupants in the space. we would replace the MERV 8 with MERV 13. So, for non-outdoor air units that do not now require MERV 13, what should we replace the MERV 8 filters with prior to occupancy?

LEED BD+C 2009 published documentation on page 453 for IEQc3.1 says: If permanently installed air handlers are used during construction, filtration media with a minimum efficiency reporting value (MERV) of 8 must be used at each return air grille, as determined by ASHRAE Standard 52.2-1999 (with errata but without addenda). Replace all filtration media immediately prior to occupancy.

The LEED BD+C 2009 addendum posted on 7/19/2010 for IEQc5 replaces the third bullet item on page 511 to now read: • In mechanically ventilated buildings, each ventilation system that supplies outdoor air shall comply with the following: o Particle filters or air cleaning devices shall be provided to clean the outdoor air at any location prior to its introduction to occupied spaces. o These filters or devices shall be rated a minimum efficiency reporting value (MERV) of 13 or higher in accordance with ASHRAE Standard 52.2. o Clean air Filtration media shall be installed in all air systems after completion of construction and prior to occupancy.

ASHRAE 62.1-2007 paragraph 5.9 says: Particulate Matter Removal. Particulate matter filters or air cleaners having a minimum efficiency reporting value (MERV) of not less than 6 when rated in accordance with ANSI/ASHRAE Standard 52.2 shall be provided upstream of all cooling coils or other devices with wetted surfaces through which air is supplied to an occupiable space.

First, it appears to me that IEQc3.1 does not require that the MERV 8 construction filters be replaced with MERV 8 filters. Second, the addendum for IEQc5 now requires MERV 13 only for outdoor air delivered to occupiable spaces. Third, ASHRAE 62.1 only requires MERV 6 upstream of wetted dehumidification surfaces. Therefore, it appears to me that all units operated during construction need MERV 8, then prior to occupancy outdoor air units that deliver air to occupied spaces need MERV 13, then prior to occupancy units that dehumidify need MERV 6, and then coil units and unit heaters that are not used for dehumidification do not appear to require any filtration.

What MERV are you finding the reviewers requiring be installed prior to occupancy on non-outdoor air units with wet coils? Or, on non-outdoor air units with dry coils? And, where is that MERV requirement published?

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Nov 03 2013 LEEDuser Moderator

Mech Engineer, I think you are overthinking it. There is no LEED specification for this.

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Sharon Morris
Dec 20 2011
Guest
106 Thumbs Up

Filtration during construction ( MERV 8)

I am currently working on a project that has a dual HVAC system. A Daikin mini split ductless system and a DOAS Desert Eir system with ducts & filtration. We would like to start up the Daikin ductless system only to increase building temperatures for installation of carpet system. However, due to the design of the units - MERVMinimum efficiency reporting value. 8 filtration would put too much strain on the systems. Can we still use these units during the construction phase and still quality for for IAQIndoor air quality: The quality and attributes of indoor air affecting the health and comfort building occupants. IAQ encompasses available fresh air, contaminant levels, acoustics and noise levels, lighting quality, and other factors. during custruction credit?

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Allison Beer McKenzie Architect, Director of Sustainability, SHP Leading Design Dec 20 2011 LEEDuser Expert 5248 Thumbs Up

Sharon- reviewers have been very specific in the past that MERVMinimum efficiency reporting value. 8 filters must be used if permanent HVAC systems are used during construction. You could consider using temporary heating systems to increase the temps and still be eligible for the credit.

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Sharon Morris Dec 20 2011 Guest 106 Thumbs Up

Thanks Allison for your reply. It seems the intent of using MERVMinimum efficiency reporting value. 8
Filters in permanent HVAC would be to prevent contamination of the ductwork. The daikon system units are permanent but are non-ducted. They are essentially super efficient space heating & cooling devices.
To bring in space heaters would be extra labor, gas, travel... Which seems to defeat many goals of LEED. There is filtration in the daikon units but no where close to MERV 8 rating. Any other ideas of who I could contact at USGBC to review this specialized system? Thanks again for your comments & suggestions.

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Robert Sutton P.E., C.E.M, President/Owner, Sutton Engineered Systems, Inc. Mar 05 2013 Guest 191 Thumbs Up

Sharon - did you ever get an answer. I too am looking at a VRF type system using the mini systems for my spaces or zones and a DOAS unit for the fresh air component. The DOAS will have filters since it is ducted but may not be able to handle MERVMinimum efficiency reporting value. 8. The zone located units would not have but a small filter that is not MERV anything I think.

We need an answer on this one. Let me know please.

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Mauricio Ramirez
Dec 05 2011
LEEDuser Member
348 Thumbs Up

On-site duct manufacture

Hi. One of the projects in which I'm involved will have on-site HVAC duct manufacture. Does this practice has any inconvenient for the compliance with the credit IEQc3.1? We should manage that once installed all the ductwork will be sealed as usual, but I haven't read a lot about requirements for on-site duct ellaboration. If anyone could comment on this, it will be much appreciated!

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Allison Beer McKenzie Architect, Director of Sustainability, SHP Leading Design Dec 05 2011 LEEDuser Expert 5248 Thumbs Up

You should be fine as long as it is protected when it stored as well as once it is installed.

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Mauricio Ramirez Dec 06 2011 LEEDuser Member 348 Thumbs Up

Thanks Allison. I was looking for all the RefGuide and other documents and couldn't find any info about on-site building. But I think as you say, that storing and protecting on installation will work. Tx.

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Patana Rattananavathong
Oct 11 2011
Guest
78 Thumbs Up

HVAC Protection

I have a project that don't use any HVAC system. It's all natural ventilation. Is it ok to left the HAVC protection out since there is nothing to protect. Can the project apply for this credit?

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Dylan Connelly Mechanical Engineer, Integral Group Nov 04 2011 LEEDuser Expert 4954 Thumbs Up

You can still apply for the credit.

However, you still need to create an IAQIndoor air quality: The quality and attributes of indoor air affecting the health and comfort building occupants. IAQ encompasses available fresh air, contaminant levels, acoustics and noise levels, lighting quality, and other factors. Management Plan for the project. Also you will also need to ensure "absorptive materials (installed or stored on-site) were protected from moisture damage during the construction and preoccupancy phases."

Then select the option "Permanently installed air handling units WERE NOT operated during construction" on the form.

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Blair Seibert Principal, Architect Verde Concepts, Inc.
Mar 07 2011
Guest
376 Thumbs Up

Limiting access once the building is enclosed

Our experience on projects is that limiting the access to one door with a long, regularly cleaned carpet, is expected by the LEED reviewer. We are currently working on a three story building and the contractor is questioning why we need to limit access to one door. He doesn't see it in the manual nor the SMACNA guidelines for Source Control. While I understand the guidelines are broad suggestions I realize now that he is NOT going to limit the access AT ALL if I can't find a reference to the requirement. Does anyone have any suggestions? What about limiting him to 2 entrances? Thanks for your help.

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David Hubka GROUP Leader, E3 GROUP Mar 07 2011 LEEDuser Expert 3732 Thumbs Up

In my past LEED projects some IAQIndoor air quality: The quality and attributes of indoor air affecting the health and comfort building occupants. IAQ encompasses available fresh air, contaminant levels, acoustics and noise levels, lighting quality, and other factors. Management Plans During Construction required the use of only one entrance at a time; some didn't. All were approved by the LEED reviewer.

As long as the integrity of the credit is upheld using more than one entrance should not disqualify you from this credit.

I am surprised a LEED reviewer required the construction team to only use one entrance. Did EQ C3.1 get denied due soley to this item?

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Blair Seibert Principal, Architect, Verde Concepts, Inc. Mar 07 2011 Guest 376 Thumbs Up

They did deny it originally because we didn't have a photo of the mat and I think we were missing some "scheduling" photos.

Thanks,

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Brad Buser Associate AIA, Elliott + Associates Architects
Mar 03 2011
Guest
38 Thumbs Up

Moisture Protection

I need some help understanding the moisture projection requirements of this credit. Our GC is believes that starting GWB before the building is fully enclosed (missing curtain wall) would be acceptable and assert that it is necessary to maintain our construction schedule. They promise that any GWB wetted by rain or otherwise would be replaced as needed.

Obviously we don't like this, but would it comply? They claim long project delays will occur if they aren't allowed to proceed with this method as they've counted on installing this way. Any suggestions? It seems unclear what the recourse would be if a material/product was subjected to moisture.

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Allison Beer McKenzie Architect, Director of Sustainability, SHP Leading Design Mar 12 2011 LEEDuser Expert 5248 Thumbs Up

Brad- this obviously isn't ideal, but it won't necessarily prevent credit achievement because the credit doesn't specify exactly have absorptive materials need to be protected. Any GWB that gets wet will definitely have to be replaced. I would also insist on some sort of regular monitoring of the installed GWB to make sure any board that has gotten wet will be identified. I would also see if the can install some protective sheeting over either the installed GWB or the open curtainwall areas to minimize likelihood of exposure.

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Michelle Reott LEED AP BD+C, ID+C, O+M, Managing Principal Earthly Ideas LLC
Jan 19 2011
LEEDuser Expert
2490 Thumbs Up

Why does v3.0 form only require photos of moisture damage?

Hasn't anyone been able to understand why the v3.0 version of the Form for this credit eschews the previous requirements for photographs of SMACNA measures and now focuses only on photos of moisture control? (“Provide photos documenting methods employed to protect absorptive materials from moisture damage during construction and pre-occupancy. Photos should highlight materials stored or installed on-site and should include date and time stamp. Photos of all noted moisture protection methods on at least 2 different time periods must be uploaded.”)

In addition, the required narrative only focuses on moisture damage protection.

I have asked this question through Feedback on LOv3 and got this unsatisfactory answer from GBCI: “Thank you for contacting the Green Building Certification Institute. This change in LEED 2009 was made to be sure projects earning this credit are keeping in line with the LEED requirement and intent of this credit. No updates have been made to the credit requirement since this guides publication which can be seen in the most recent addenda for the Green Building Design and Construction 2009 guide, found through this link http://www.usgbc.org/ShowFile.aspx?DocumentID=6392. We however do thank you for your comments and recommendations which will be considered for future updates to the current guide as well as future guides.

If you have any further questions or concerns, please feel free to use the contact form at http://www.gbci.org/contactus or call us at 1.800.795.1746. Thanks!”

I then resubmitted this request and asked why GBCI was answering a question about rating system feedback. I got a reply saying this was passed onto USGBC and I should remember that GBCI is a separate organization and is not responsible for the rating system. Hmmm... That reply was over a month ago and still no response.

Consider updating the IAQIndoor air quality: The quality and attributes of indoor air affecting the health and comfort building occupants. IAQ encompasses available fresh air, contaminant levels, acoustics and noise levels, lighting quality, and other factors. Photo Documentation in the Documentation Toolkit for this credit to reflect this new requirement for photos – unless an addendum changes it in the near future.

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Allison Beer McKenzie Architect, Director of Sustainability, SHP Leading Design Jan 21 2011 LEEDuser Expert 5248 Thumbs Up

Michelle- I find this odd as well, but I unfortunately don't have an answer for you as far as why this is the case. Since the credit requirements haven't really changed, though, we are just going about the credit the same way we always have.

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Jan 24 2011 LEEDuser Moderator

I heard a while back that it was not intentional that photo documentation of only moisture control measures was being asked for, and the form would be updated to be broader. However, I would have expected the form to be updated by now, so I don't know if this is still in the works.

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Caroline Hedin
Dec 15 2010
LEEDuser Member
755 Thumbs Up

2 Phase Construction, Ductwork and LEED Certification

We are working on a warehouse/office remodel. Due to the extent of the remodel we are pursuing LEED NC for the project. Currently Phase 1 of the project is under construction. We will be registering the project for Phase 2 and must achieve LEED Silver due to funding requirements.

We are compiling a change order to install a small portion of the Phase 2 ductwork during Phase 1 due to the location of the Mechanical Room. Silver is going to be extremely difficult for us to achieve so I would like to be extra cautious and make sure the installation of this ductwork will not adversly affect our chances of obtaining certification.

The scope of work includes only installing ducts in one room and not connecting either end to registers or equipment.

All that being said, are there instructions you would recommend we include to the Contractor/Subcontractor to ensure we do harm compliance requirements?

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Allison Beer McKenzie Architect, Director of Sustainability, SHP Leading Design Dec 15 2010 LEEDuser Expert 5248 Thumbs Up

Caroline- I am a little bit confused about you attempting to certify phase 2 only and not phase 1. Make sure you're meeting the Minimum Program Requirements that require the certification of a whole building. As long as you are meeting that requirement, you should simply protect the ductwork installed earlier (including ducts that remain that have been in place for years) by wrapping them, sealing them etc. during the phase two construction as part of your IAQIndoor air quality: The quality and attributes of indoor air affecting the health and comfort building occupants. IAQ encompasses available fresh air, contaminant levels, acoustics and noise levels, lighting quality, and other factors. management plan during construction.

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Caroline Hedin Dec 15 2010 LEEDuser Member 755 Thumbs Up

Allison,

Thank you. I thought sealing them would be adequate but wanted to sound off on the forum to see if that's how others felt also.

As for excluding Phase 1, it gets a bit complicated. Phase 1 involves a minimal amount of work. Since Phase 2 is so extensive it requires whole building certification. While we are being cautiously aware of what may affect final certification we did not have the time to begin the documentation during Phase 1.

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Chris Dewey Project Manager Van Auken Akins Architects LLC
Sep 27 2010
LEEDuser Member
101 Thumbs Up

Gas Fired Equipment

There is a project proposing temporary heating be provided by propane torpedo heaters for the winter. Do these heaters qualify as gas fired equipment that need to be exhausted to the outside? Does using the torpedo heaters negate the LEED point automatically?

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Oct 08 2010 LEEDuser Moderator

I think you would want to do everything possible to limit interior machine exhaust, but I'm not sure I would go so far as saying that it disqualifies you from earning the point. How many heaters would you be using, for how long? How much ventilation would the space be getting, i.e., how open is it?

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KC Rat ESG
Sep 24 2010
LEEDuser Member
339 Thumbs Up

Anti-termite Treatment

Is there any ruling in LEED related to this activity which generally happens once the sub-structure construction complete?

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Allison Beer McKenzie Architect, Director of Sustainability, SHP Leading Design Sep 24 2010 LEEDuser Expert 5248 Thumbs Up

Keerthi- I don't know of anything specifically regarding termite treatment, but you should follow typical SMACNA guidelines of exhausting the space during use, keeping the product away from absorptive materials and covering or removing the product container from the site when application is complete.

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Joseph Blanco Principal RESCUE Green
Aug 03 2010
LEEDuser Member
523 Thumbs Up

Pre Conditioning

Within a IAQIndoor air quality: The quality and attributes of indoor air affecting the health and comfort building occupants. IAQ encompasses available fresh air, contaminant levels, acoustics and noise levels, lighting quality, and other factors. plan, is there a requirement to have specefic products or construction material pre conditioned prior to installations and if so does it need to occur off site.

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Aug 04 2010 LEEDuser Moderator

Can you give an example of what you mean by pre-conditioned?

I can't think of an example where this is required, but without hearing more from you I don't want to rule it out.

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Joseph Blanco Principal, RESCUE Green Aug 05 2010 LEEDuser Member 523 Thumbs Up

well, im guessing that my client is talking about materials such as cabinets that will need to be worked on, onsite that will distrupt the IAQIndoor air quality: The quality and attributes of indoor air affecting the health and comfort building occupants. IAQ encompasses available fresh air, contaminant levels, acoustics and noise levels, lighting quality, and other factors. for the construction site.

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Aug 05 2010 LEEDuser Moderator

If the cabinets are being worked on onsite, this falls under the "Source Protection" part of your IAQIndoor air quality: The quality and attributes of indoor air affecting the health and comfort building occupants. IAQ encompasses available fresh air, contaminant levels, acoustics and noise levels, lighting quality, and other factors. management plan, and there would be requirements around that. For more see the Checklists tab above, and the Documentation Toolkit.

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Xing Shi Dr. Southeast University
Jul 16 2010
Guest
298 Thumbs Up

IEQc3.1 and IEQc3.2

According to LEED Online Form, the same IAQIndoor air quality: The quality and attributes of indoor air affecting the health and comfort building occupants. IAQ encompasses available fresh air, contaminant levels, acoustics and noise levels, lighting quality, and other factors. Management Plan would be used in both IEQc3.1 and IEQc3.2.

In IEQc3.2 Form, it is said that "Upload the IAQ Management Plan for the project building; highlight IAQ management practices implemented during construction".

However, IEQc3.2 is about post-construction IAQ management practices.

So, could I apply for IEQc3.2 only? with an IAQ Management Plan which may not meet requirements in IEQc3.1.

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Allison Beer McKenzie Architect, Director of Sustainability, SHP Leading Design Jul 16 2010 LEEDuser Expert 5248 Thumbs Up

It is definitely possible to do IEQc3.2 without doing IEQc3.1. While it is common to do both and therefore have an IAQIndoor air quality: The quality and attributes of indoor air affecting the health and comfort building occupants. IAQ encompasses available fresh air, contaminant levels, acoustics and noise levels, lighting quality, and other factors. management plan that covers both, it is not required. While the form gives you the option to pull in a plan that has been uploaded through IEQc3.1, it also gives you the opportunity of uploading a new or different plan as well. If you did not use an IAQ management plan during construction, you simply would not have any practices implemented during construction to highlight, because your IAQ plan would only have procedures used after construction such as information on the flush-out you performed.

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